Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-mm7gn Total loading time: 0.428 Render date: 2022-08-16T03:28:45.406Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Chapter 6 - Banana and Plantain

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Dominic Fuccillo
Affiliation:
University of Arkansas
Linda Sears
Affiliation:
International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome
Paul Stapleton
Affiliation:
International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome
Get access

Summary

BOTANY AND DISTRIBUTION

The genus Musa belongs to the Musaceae family, and ‘banana plant’ describes all wild species, landraces and cultivars. ‘Plantain’ describes landraces whose fruit is eaten cooked, mainly in Central and West Africa (Simmonds 1962; Stover and Simmonds 1987). Cultivated banana exhibits parthenocarpic fruit development, a marked degree of sterility, and vegetative propagation. Wild banana (Table 6.1) exhibits sexual reproduction and vegetative propagation by ratooning. Common names are numerous (Jarret 1990), and in Uganda alone Karamura and Karamura (1994) have identified 566 names used just for the subgroup Mutika/Lujugira of the AAA group.

Virtually all the cultivars derive from the Eumusa section, which Simmonds and Weatherup (1990) have divided into two subsections, Eumusa (1) and Eumusa (2). Edible banana plants derived from the Eumusa section are mainly based on the recognition of a single source for most varieties, Musa acuminata (A genome) and M. balbisiana (B genome) (Cheesman 1947,1948; Dodds and Simmonds 1948). The Australimusa section is important as a genetic source of domestication for textile fibres (Abaca or Manila hemp) and the edible Fe'i or Fehi cultivars, found only in the Pacific Islands. Callimusa and Australimusa have a basic chromosome number of 10 (2n=20) while Eumusa and Rhodochlamys have 11 (2n=22). The Simmonds and Shepherd (1955) classification associates the ploidy level (2n=2x, 3x or 4x) with a different contribution of genomes of two species.

Type
Chapter
Information
Biodiversity in Trust
Conservation and Use of Plant Genetic Resources in CGIAR Centres
, pp. 67 - 81
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
14
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×