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Section III - Issues in Plant Domestication

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Paul Gepts
Affiliation:
University of California, Davis
Thomas R. Famula
Affiliation:
University of California, Davis
Robert L. Bettinger
Affiliation:
University of California, Davis
Stephen B. Brush
Affiliation:
University of California, Davis
Ardeshir B. Damania
Affiliation:
University of California, Davis
Patrick E. McGuire
Affiliation:
University of California, Davis
Calvin O. Qualset
Affiliation:
University of California, Davis
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Summary

Issues in Plant Domestication

The four contributions in this section illustrate the domestication continuum across time and space. While domestication started in specific areas (variously called centers of agricultural origins or domestication or even Vavilovian centers), it is now conducted outside these original areas as well. Likewise, domestication started roughly 10,000 years ago in association with the end of the last ice age, and is still practiced today by farmers and breeders. Each stage and location of agricultural development represents potentially different evolutionary factors that can shape the domesticated gene pools. Dissemination from the original hearths of agriculture undoubtedly brought into the picture factors such as selection for adaptation to new environments as well as genetic drift due to small sample sizes. Different cultivation areas also reflect different human cultural environments and, hence, distinct cultivation and consumption requirements.

Type
Chapter
Information
Biodiversity in Agriculture
Domestication, Evolution, and Sustainability
, pp. 309 - 310
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

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