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6 - Lexical Selection and Competition in Bilinguals

from Part II - Bilingual Lexical Processing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 December 2019

Roberto R. Heredia
Affiliation:
Texas A & M University
Anna B. Cieślicka
Affiliation:
Texas A & M University
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Summary

This chapter critically reviews the main literature on bilingual lexical selection and competition with an emphasis on speech production and cross-language cognates. We review the most relevant evidence of language coactivation, language competition, and language inhibition, with a focus on evidence from the language- and task-switching paradigm. The chapter also looks at the main factors affecting language control as well as to the extent to which language control is a subsidiary of domain-general executive functions. Finally, we discuss ongoing dialogues on the bilingual advantage debate.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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