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Part II - A View of Risk Culture Concepts in Firms and Society

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 May 2020

Michelle Tuveson
Affiliation:
Judge Business School, Cambridge
Daniel Ralph
Affiliation:
Judge Business School, Cambridge
Kern Alexander
Affiliation:
Universität Zürich
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Beyond Bad Apples
Risk Culture in Business
, pp. 139 - 270
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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