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Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 September 2020

Jacqueline Bhabha
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
Wenona Giles
Affiliation:
York University, Toronto
Faraaz Mahomed
Affiliation:
FXB Center for Health and Human Rights
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Summary

The importance of primary and secondary education as fundamental drivers of empowerment, achievement and inclusion is widely acknowledged. So is the increasing need for higher education (HE) – education that extends beyond secondary school graduation and that delivers academic, technical or professional instruction – as an essential prerequisite for advancement in contemporary, global society.

Type
Chapter
Information
A Better Future
The Role of Higher Education for Displaced and Marginalised People
, pp. 1 - 18
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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