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1 - Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2013

David B. Arciniegas
Affiliation:
University of Colorado, School of Medicine
C. Alan Anderson
Affiliation:
University of Colorado, School of Medicine
Christopher M. Filley
Affiliation:
University of Colorado, School of Medicine
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Summary

Neurology and psychiatry are securely established medical specialties with well-demarcated areas of clinical and research expertise. Behavioral neurology (BN) is widely held to have begun with the work of Norman Geschwind in the mid-twentieth century. A neuropsychiatric approach to patient care began to reemerge and steadily gain momentum as physicians increasingly appreciated the neurologic bases of psychiatric disease and the psychiatric aspects of neurologic disease. The prospect of BN and neuropsychiatry (NP) drawing together finds considerable support in academia. Annual scholarly meetings are held conjointly by the Society for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology and the American Neuropsychiatric Association in order to disseminate new research findings and educate practitioners. Traumatic brain injury occupies a major portion of the practice of many subspecialists in BN&NP and additional studies are needed to better define the best methods of neurorehabilitation.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

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