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Chapter 13 - Brown Bear (Ursus arctos; North America)

from Part II - Species Accounts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 November 2020

Vincenzo Penteriani
Affiliation:
Spanish Council of Scientific Research (CSIC)
Mario Melletti
Affiliation:
WPSG (Wild Pig Specialist Group) IUCN SSC
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Summary

This chapter comprises the following sections: names, taxonomy, subspecies and distribution, descriptive notes, habitat, movements and home range, activity patterns, feeding ecology, reproduction and growth, behavior, parasites and diseases, status in the wild, and status in captivity.

Type
Chapter
Information
Bears of the World
Ecology, Conservation and Management
, pp. 162 - 195
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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