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4 - Of the Administration of the Universal Kingdom

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

William Lamont
Affiliation:
University of Sussex
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Summary

Having spoken of the CONSTITUTION of the Kingdom of God, I shall proceed to speak of the ADMINISTRATION thereof.

Thes. 35. God as the Soveraign Ruler of mankind hath given him the Law of nature, commonly called the Morall Law, to be the Rule of his obedience.

1. The Law of nature in the primary most proper sence, is to be found in natura rerum, in the whole Creation that is objected to our Knowledg, as it is a Glass in which we may see the Lord, and much of his Will; and as it is a Signifler of that Will of God concerning our duty. 2. The Law of nature is sometime taken for that Disposition or Aptitude that there is in mans nature to the actual knowledg of these naturally revealed things, especially some clear and greatest Principles, which almost all the world discern. 3. And it is sometime taken for the Actual knowledge of those plain and common Principles. 4. And sometime for the Actual knowledge of all that meer Nature doth reveal. When I say God hath given man this law of nature, I mean, both that he hath made an Impress of his minde upon the Creation, and set us this Glass to see himself, and much of our Duty in, & also that he hath given to the very nature of man a Capacity of perceiving what is thus revealed, and a disposition especially to the Reception of the more obvious Principles; so that by ordinary helps, they will be quickly known; and the rest may be known if we be not wanting to our selves.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1994

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