Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-846f6c7c4f-tkmnj Total loading time: 0.243 Render date: 2022-07-07T08:51:34.892Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Book Three

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 March 2021

Get access

Summary

[I] [60] When Antioch was besieged many [Turks] had flocked to its assistance, and many were still arriving. But of those who had come, some were killed when the city was captured, some were taken into the citadel, some, indeed, fled for their lives. Those who were arriving stopped when they heard what had befallen the Antiochenes, debating whether to withdraw to a distance or to approach closer. The news that was everywhere urged them to withdraw, warning them of the Christians’ successes and that greater triumphs were destined from these, and for this reason the greatest possible dread was engendered in the breast of every single one of them. But anger at the enemy's slaughter of their fellow Turks encouraged them to approach, as did shame for the pilgrims’ boldness that they had not yet restrained. They also placed their trust in the extensive numbers of their assembled nations and in their singular courage, as they were wont to boast. In addition, they said that they lacked glory unless their many could hold in check the stupidity of the few; unless the natives could drive the foreigners out of their territory; unless they could avenge the blood of their fellows shed by the enemy; unless their sons and wives and their household gods and the rest of their domestic goods could be kept safe and undisturbed.

The prince and general of these men was a certain Kerbogha, a man who was very warlike indeed, second to none in courage, endowed with good sense, abounding in wealth, surrounded closely by military reinforcements, avid for praise, swollen by the arrogance of his boasting, a man of great renown, the master of the Persian sultan's army. When Yaghi-Siyan, the emir of Antioch, was under siege he summoned this man with many legations to make haste and deliver Antioch, for he would send him back rewarded with many gifts. But Kerbogha, both in order to receive the promised pay and also and especially so that his renown would spread, had received from the caliph, the pope of his people, licence to rage against the Christians and he had amassed countless peoples, namely Turks, Saracens, Arabs, Publicans, Azimites, Kurds, Persians, Agulania and countless others, and brought together a huge army.

Type
Chapter
Information
Baldric of Bourgueil "History of the Jerusalemites"
A Translation of the Historia Ierosolimitana
, pp. 101 - 132
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×