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Book Four

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 March 2021

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[I] [95] In fact, the cause of the feud between the princes was Antioch. Furthermore, the pretexts for the dispute were that one claimed that the oath had been made to the emperor openly by all and he was not willing to collude in its being broken in any way; the other was saying that the gift of the city had been made to him by all, and therefore he wanted to take possession of the gift made to him. But both things were true. And although the situation was thus, since nevertheless they were unable to be reconciled it was a great hindrance to all the army. After Bohemond had withdrawn to Antioch, Count Raymond pursued the princes who were in Antioch by way of his envoys and exhorted them to meet him at Rugia for the sake of discussions. The princes he summoned came to Rugia, namely Godfrey and Robert of Normandy and Robert of Flanders, and they brought Bohemond with them. They talked about reconciling the leaders, just like yesterday and the day before. After the matter had once again failed to reach a satisfactory result, the princes returned gloomily to Antioch, because they were still getting nowhere concerning the completion of their journey. Neither the count nor Bohemond was willing to go because they were still disputing violently about the city. Bohemond refused to go unless the entire city was handed over to him, and so did the count unless Bohemond accompanied them.

The count returned to Marra, where the Christian army was in danger of starvation. Moreover, he was pierced to the heart and mastered by a noble impulse; and in order to look after God's soldiers he set out on the journey to Jerusalem, for he placed God's cause before his own desire or advantage. Indeed, it is the greatest virtue in princes if they master themselves for themselves, and if they do not stubbornly persist. For excessive stubbornness in leaders is a danger to all their subordinates. Therefore the count took command of himself for himself so that he would not harm all Christendom. He attended to commanding his men in the palace of Yaghi-Siyan to guard it carefully.

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Baldric of Bourgueil "History of the Jerusalemites"
A Translation of the Historia Ierosolimitana
, pp. 133 - 158
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2020

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