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Preface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 August 2009

Donald R. Demuth
Affiliation:
Professor, University of Louisville School of Dentistry
Richard J. Lamont
Affiliation:
Professor, University of Florida
Donald R. Demuth
Affiliation:
University of Louisville, Kentucky
Richard Lamont
Affiliation:
University of Florida
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Summary

It is now well established that a number of bacteria communicate through diffusible signals that may induce and/or regulate a coordinated response by the individual organisms that make up a given population or biofilm. For many of these organisms, it has been suggested that intercellular signaling functions to report population density or to coordinate a response from all cells in a microbial community. Therefore, cell-to-cell communication has been referred to as auto-induction or quorum sensing. The response of bacteria to quorum sensing signals is quite varied and includes, for example, the induction of bioluminescence, the regulation of virulence gene expression, the formation of biofilms, or the induction of horizontal transfer of genetic material. It is also becoming increasingly apparent that some bacteria may communicate via contact-dependent signaling mechanisms, and that the response to direct cell-to-cell contact influences complex behaviors that may contribute to multicellular development or the adaptation to growth in complex biofilms. In the past five to ten years, increased interest and research in the mechanisms of bacterial cell-to-cell communication has revealed surprising complexity both in the signaling processes themselves and in the breadth of the response of recipient cells to the signal molecules. For example, a variety of chemical species, e.g. acyl-homoserine lactones, oligopeptides, furan derivatives (i.e. AI-2), quinolones, butyrolactones, and unsaturated fatty acids are known or have been suggested to function as diffusible signals. Furthermore, some organisms, most notably Pseudomonas aeruginosa and species of Vibrio, have been shown to produce and respond to multiple diffusible signal molecules.

Type
Chapter
Information
Bacterial Cell-to-Cell Communication
Role in Virulence and Pathogenesis
, pp. xiii - xvi
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2006

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  • Preface
  • Edited by Donald R. Demuth, University of Louisville, Kentucky, Richard Lamont, University of Florida
  • Book: Bacterial Cell-to-Cell Communication
  • Online publication: 08 August 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511541506.001
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  • Preface
  • Edited by Donald R. Demuth, University of Louisville, Kentucky, Richard Lamont, University of Florida
  • Book: Bacterial Cell-to-Cell Communication
  • Online publication: 08 August 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511541506.001
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Preface
  • Edited by Donald R. Demuth, University of Louisville, Kentucky, Richard Lamont, University of Florida
  • Book: Bacterial Cell-to-Cell Communication
  • Online publication: 08 August 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511541506.001
Available formats
×