Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-727vs Total loading time: 0.594 Render date: 2022-12-04T06:44:01.097Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Chapter 11 - Dealing with Visions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 November 2018

Douglas Turkington
Affiliation:
Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University
Helen M. Spencer
Affiliation:
Northumberland, Tyne & Wear NHS Foundation Trust
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Back to Life, Back to Normality
CBT Informed Recovery for Families with Relatives with Schizophrenia and Other Psychoses
, pp. 70 - 78
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

References

Collerton, D., Perry, E. & McKeith, I. (2005) Why people see things that are not there: A novel perception and attention deficit model for recurrent complex visual hallucinations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 28, 737–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gauntlett-Gilbert, J. & Kuipers, E. (2005) Visual hallucinations in psychiatric conditions: Appraisals and their relationship to distress. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 44, 7787.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Further Reading

For more information about visions please consider the following.

Websites/Other Info

A website which provides examples of when people have seen faces in everyday objects: www.boredpanda.com/pareidolia-faces-everyday-objects/

Useful website information includes Michael Shermer's TED talk covering topics that show how powerful expectation can be and how easily tricked we can be by optical illusions, etc.: www.ted.com/talks/michael_shermer_on_believing_strange_things?language=en

Intervoice is an online community where people share experiences about hearing voices, but they often consider other experiences such as visions: www.intervoiceonline.org

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×