Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-pkshj Total loading time: 0.289 Render date: 2021-12-03T17:39:32.665Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Chapter 7 - Piety, Pride and the Problem of Evil

De libero arbitrio

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 February 2018

Erik Kenyon
Affiliation:
Rollins College, Florida
Get access

Summary

De libero arbitrio’s “faith seeking understanding” and rambling scriptural exegesis may seem to depart from the Platonist methods of C. Acad. The difference, I suggest, is scale. Like Sol. + De imm. an., De lib. arbit. 1 and 2 each presents a complete round of ARP. Book 3’s exploration of Genesis, while longer, functions analogously to the scriptural cues of earlier dialogues’ plausible conclusions. The key is another virtue: piety. Augustine defines this as (a) thinking of God in the highest terms, (b) thanking God for even minor goods and (c) taking responsibility for one’s own shortcomings. He presents this as prerequisite for fruitful philosophical inquiry. I suggest that the work’s two rounds of ARP aim to instill piety as preparation for book 3’s search for a scriptural answer to evil. Book 1’s discussion of sin instills (c), book 2’s proof for God’s existence instills (a) and its grades of goods instill (b). In book 3, Augustine addresses evil from theoretical and pastoral angles at once, identifying pride as the root of sin and nurturing piety as a remedy to it. My reading shows Augustine’s final dialogue to be tightly unified around a project firmly rooted in his first.
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×