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Conclusion

Augustine and the Academy Today

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 February 2018

Erik Kenyon
Affiliation:
Rollins College, Florida
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Summary

The concluding chapter opens by suggesting how the present study may refocus existing debates. My account of Augustine’s method brings new substance to the historicity debate by elaborating what it would mean for Augustine’s flesh-and-blood companions to bring the words and Augustine, as author, to organize them. And by shifting the developmental debate’s focus on doctrinal content onto issues of methodology, I reframe the question of Augustine’s development over time and suggest a smooth progression as Augustine fuses Platonist pedagogy and Christian exegesis in increasingly sophisticated ways. I close by drawing out the implications of Augustine’s pedagogical methods for teachers today. The dialogues’ emphasis on unteaching through aporetic debate runs usefully counter to today’s test-taking culture. Their search for self-knowledge through reflection brings a third option to the contest between content and marketable skills which tends to frame current discussions of the liberal arts’ value. And their willingness to trade in provisional, plausible conclusions provides an attractive model for navigating our pluralistic society.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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  • Conclusion
  • Erik Kenyon, Rollins College, Florida
  • Book: Augustine and the Dialogue
  • Online publication: 16 February 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108525558.009
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  • Conclusion
  • Erik Kenyon, Rollins College, Florida
  • Book: Augustine and the Dialogue
  • Online publication: 16 February 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108525558.009
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Conclusion
  • Erik Kenyon, Rollins College, Florida
  • Book: Augustine and the Dialogue
  • Online publication: 16 February 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108525558.009
Available formats
×