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3 - Indigenous Peoples under International Economic Law

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 April 2021

Sergio Puig
Affiliation:
University of Arizona
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Summary

States, international organizations and private businesses have distinct but complementary duties concerning human rights. States are obligated to respect, protect and fulfill human rights within their jurisdiction. International organizations are obligated to ensure that their activities, suc as financing infrastructure or peacekeeping in conflict zones, conform with (and in some cases protect) human rights. Business actors may not have the same responsibility as states or international organizations. For decades we have seen an increase in the number and in the development of frameworks that encourage economic globalization. We have also observed a similar path in the expansion of the international law frameworks that protect human rights, including indigenous human rights. Despite the growth of the two fields, both have developed separately, almost independently, although the two are fundamental to international law and a reflection of the world, especially after World War II (WWII). Frameworks regulating economic globalization have invariably lacked mechanisms of accountability on human rights.

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At the Margins of Globalization
Indigenous Peoples and International Economic Law
, pp. 36 - 81
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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