Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-66nw2 Total loading time: 0.418 Render date: 2021-12-08T01:15:14.238Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

28 - Generic predictions of quantum theories of gravity

from Part V - Effective models and Quantum Gravity phenomenology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 October 2009

Daniele Oriti
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Get access

Summary

Introduction

How does a proposal for unification go from an interesting body of mathematical results to a plausible explanation of natural phenomena? While evidence of mathematical consistency is ultimately important, what is often decisive is that a proposed unification leads to predictions of phenomena that are both new and generic. By generic I mean that the new phenomena are general consequences of the proposed unification and thus hold for a wide range of parameters as well as for generic initial conditions. The proposal becomes an explanation when some of those new generic phenonena are observed.

Generic consequences of unification often involve processes in which the things unified transform into each other. For example, electromagnetic waves are a generic consequence of unifying electricity and magnetism, weak vector bosons are a generic consequence of unifying the weak and electromagnetic interactions, and light bending is a generic consequence of the equivalence principle which unifies gravity and inertia.

Looking at history, we see that the reasons why proposals for unification succeed or fail often have to do with their generic consequences. In successful cases the consequences do not conflict with previous experiments but are easily confirmed when looked for in new experiments. These are cases in which we come to celebrate the unification. In bad cases the consequences generically disagree with experiment. Some of these cases still survive for some time because the theory has parameters that can be tuned to hide the consequences of the unification.

Type
Chapter
Information
Approaches to Quantum Gravity
Toward a New Understanding of Space, Time and Matter
, pp. 548 - 570
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
3
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×