Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5959bf8d4d-89n48 Total loading time: 1.393 Render date: 2022-12-08T21:15:15.377Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Chapter 2 - Otolaryngology instruments 101 for the anesthesiologist

from Section 1 - Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2012

Basem Abdelmalak
Affiliation:
Cleveland Clinic Foundation
John Doyle
Affiliation:
Cleveland Clinic Foundation
Get access

Summary

This chapter introduces some of the more common otolaryngology instruments used during procedures involving the larynx, trachea, cervical esophagus, pharynx, and paranasal sinuses. Surgery of the larynx, pharynx, and trachea begins with securing the airway with an appropriate device that will allow for adequate ventilation. Many cases of septoplasty and rhinoplasty are performed under local anesthesia with varying degrees of sedation. Transoral robotic surgery is an emerging technology that is becoming more common at tertiary care centers. Surgery of the upper aerodigestive tract deals with diverse pathology that requires a variety of special surgical instrumentation. Given the demands of the surgeon and anesthesiologist, it is crucial for optimal patient care that open communication before, during, and after the procedure be the standard operating protocol. Basic understanding of otolaryngologic instrumentation as described in the chapter will hopefully allow for mutual understanding between the surgical and anesthesia teams.
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×