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1 - Stress in Structures

from Part I - The Fundamentals of Structural Analysis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Bruce K. Donaldson
Affiliation:
University of Maryland, College Park
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Summary

The Concept of Stress

Structural engineers are concerned with the effects that forces produce on structures. That forces produce results such as deformations or structural collapse is the usual structural engineering cause-to-effect point of view. Even though this viewpoint is not the only possible or even useful viewpoint, it is the one adopted implicitly in Parts I, II, and III of this text as a temporary convenience until it becomes necessary to adopt a more general viewpoint. In other words, the usual engineering viewpoint is that the forces are an input, the structure is the system, and the effects of the forces acting on the structure (deformations, cracking, etc.) are the output. If a structural effect in turn influences the forces acting on the structure, then a feedback loop involving the forces and the structural effect exists. An example of structural feedback is first encountered in Part III of this text in the form of a beam buckling problem.

The theory that is developed in the next four chapters is valid for any type of force or combination of forces (within certain limits), and any type of structure. The task of classifying types of forces and structures can wait until it becomes necessary. What is necessary now is to begin to discuss the types of effects that forces produce on structures. One effect that forces can produce is structural failure. Structural failure is defined simply as occurring whenever a structure no longer can serve its intended use.

Type
Chapter
Information
Analysis of Aircraft Structures
An Introduction
, pp. 5 - 37
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

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  • Stress in Structures
  • Bruce K. Donaldson, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Book: Analysis of Aircraft Structures
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511801631.004
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  • Stress in Structures
  • Bruce K. Donaldson, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Book: Analysis of Aircraft Structures
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511801631.004
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Stress in Structures
  • Bruce K. Donaldson, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Book: Analysis of Aircraft Structures
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511801631.004
Available formats
×