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18 - Sacred Texts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2021

Stephen Pihlaja
Affiliation:
Newman University
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Summary

Introduces the key concept of sacred texts and their role in religious belief and practice, focusing specifically on how the reading of sacred texts can create a spatial and temporal experience of the divine for readers.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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