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20 - Conclusion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2021

Stephen Pihlaja
Affiliation:
Newman University
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Summary

Draws the book to its conclusion, considering the main themes in light of the history of research into language and religion, and offering suggestions for several main streams of research going forward.

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

Crystal, D. (1964). A liturgical language in a linguistic perspective. New Blackfriars, 148–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crystal, D. (1990). A liturgical language in a sociolinguistic perspective. In , D. & Jasper, R.C.D. (eds.), Language and the Worship of the Church (pp. 120–46). Basingstoke: Macmillan.Google Scholar
Crystal, D. (2008). Txtng: The Gr8 Db8. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Crystal, D. (2011). Internet Linguistics. Abingdon: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crystal, D. (2020). Let’s Talk: How English Conversation Works. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Crystal, D., & Davy, D. (1969). Investigating English Style. Harlow: Longman.Google Scholar
Davies, M. English Corpora. www.english-corpora.org.Google Scholar
Hammond, C. (2015). The Sound of the Liturgy. London: SPCK.Google Scholar
Jones, E. (2020). ‘Have Mass, will travel’. The Tablet, 6 June, 1819.Google Scholar
Lamb, C. (2020). Post-Covid Catholicism. The Tablet, 30 May, 89.Google Scholar
Pihlaja, S. (2018). Religious Talk Online: the Evangelical Discourse of Christians, Muslims, and Atheists. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rosenberg, B. A. (1970). The formulaic quality of spontaneous sermons. Journal of American Folklore, 83, 320.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rosowsky, A. (2017). Faith and Language Practices in Digital Spaces. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Samarin, W. J. (ed.). (1976). Language in Religious Practice. Rowley, MA: Newbury House.Google Scholar

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