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III - Operative Delivery and the Third Stage

from Section 2 - Pregnancy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 April 2019

Róisín Monteiro
Affiliation:
Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals’ NHS Trust
Marwa Salman
Affiliation:
Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust
Surbhi Malhotra
Affiliation:
Chelsea and Westminster Hospital
Steve Yentis
Affiliation:
Chelsea and Westminster Hospital
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Analgesia, Anaesthesia and Pregnancy
A Practical Guide
, pp. 97 - 140
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Further reading

Anim-Somuah, M, Smyth, RM, Cyna, AM, Cuthbert, A. Epidural versus non-epidural or no analgesia for pain management in labour. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2018; (5): CD000331.Google ScholarPubMed
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Further reading

Lucas, DN, Yentis, SM, Kinsella, SM, et al. Urgency of caesarean section: a new classification. J R Soc Med 2000; 93: 346–50.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, Royal College of Anaesthetists. Classification of urgency of caesarean section: a continuum of risk. Good Practice 11. London: RCOG, 2010. www.rcog.org.uk/classification-of-urgency-of-caesarean-section-good-practice-11 (accessed December 2018).
Yentis, SM. Whose distress is it anyway? ‘Fetal distress’ and the 30-minute rule. Anaesthesia 2003; 58: 732–3.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Further reading

Arzola, C, Wieczorek, PM. Efficacy of low-dose bupivacaine in spinal anaesthesia for Caesarean delivery: systematic review and meta-analysis. Br J Anaesth 2011; 107: 308–18.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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Further reading

Allam, J, Malhotra, S, Hemingway, C, Yentis, SM. Epidural lidocaine–bicarbonate–adrenaline vs. levobupivacaine for emergency Caesarean section: a randomised controlled trial. Anaesthesia 2008; 63: 243–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lam, DT, Ngan Kee, WD, Khaw, KS. Extension of epidural blockade in labour for emergency Caesarean section using 2% lidocaine with epinephrine and fentanyl, with or without alkalinisation. Anaesthesia 2001; 56: 790–4.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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Malhotra, S, Yentis, SM. Extending low-dose epidural analgesia in labour for emergency Caesarean section: a comparison of levobupivacaine with or without fentanyl. Anaesthesia 2007; 62: 667–71.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sanders, SD, Mallory, S, Lucas, DN, et al. Extending low-dose epidural analgesia for emergency caesarean section using ropivacaine 0.75%. Anaesthesia 2004; 59: 988–92.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Further reading

Dahl, V, Spreng, UJ. Anaesthesia for urgent (grade 1) caesarean section. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol 2009; 22: 352–6.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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Further reading

Algie, CM, Mahar, RK, Tan, HB, et al. Effectiveness and risks of cricoid pressure during rapid sequence induction for endotracheal intubation. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2015; (11): CD011656.Google ScholarPubMed
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Further reading

Kinsella, SM, Winton, AL, Mushambi, MC, et al. Failed tracheal intubation during obstetric general anaesthesia: a literature review. Int J Obstet Anesth 2015; 24: 356–74.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mhyre, JM, Healy, D. The unanticipated difficult intubation in obstetrics. Anesth Analg 2011; 112: 648–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mushambi, MC, Kinsella, SM, Popat, M, et al. Obstetric Anaesthetists’ Association and Difficult Airway Society guidelines for the management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation in obstetrics. Anaesthesia 2015; 70: 1286–306.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Quinn, AC, Milne, D, Columb, M, Gorton, H, Knight, M. Failed tracheal intubation in obstetric anaesthesia: 2 yr national case–control study in the UK. Br J Anaesth 2013; 110: 7480.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Further reading

Baker, PA, Weller, JM, Greenland, KB, Riley, RH, Merry, AF. Education in airway management. Anaesthesia 2011; 66: 101–11.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lewis, SR, Butler, AR, Parker, J, Cook, TM, Smith, AF. Videolaryngoscopy versus direct laryngoscopy in adult patients requiring tracheal intubation. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2016 (11): CD011136.Google ScholarPubMed
Popat, MT, Srivastava, M, Russell, R. Awake fibreoptic intubation skills in obstetric patients: a survey of anaesthetists in the Oxford region. Int J Obstet Anesth 2000; 9: 7882.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Scott-Brown, S. Russell, R. Video laryngoscopes and the obstetric airway. Int J Obstet Anesth 2015; 24: 137–46.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Further reading

Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. The Management of Third- and Fourth-Degree Perineal Tears. Green-top Guideline 29. London: RCOG, 2015. www.rcog.org.uk/en/guidelines-research-services/guidelines/gtg29 (accessed December 2018).

Further reading

Abdallah, FW, Halpern, SH, Margarido, CB. Transversus abdominis plane block for postoperative analgesia after caesarean delivery performed under spinal anaesthesia? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Br J Anaes 2012; 109: 679–87.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Carvalho, B, Butwick, AJ. Postcesarean delivery analgesia. Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol 2017; 31: 6979.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mkontwana, N, Novikova, N. Oral analgesia for relieving post-caesarean pain. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2015; (3): CD010450.Google ScholarPubMed
Wuytack, F, Smith, V, Cleary, BJ. Oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (single dose) for perineal pain in the early postpartum period. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2016; (7): CD011352.Google ScholarPubMed

Further reading

Corso, E, Hind, D, Beever, D, et al. Enhanced recovery after elective caesarean: a rapid review of clinical protocols, and an umbrella of systematic reviews. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth 2017; 17: 91.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Laronche, A, Popescu, L, Benhamou, D. An enhanced recovery programme after caesarean delivery increases maternal satisfaction and improves maternal-neonatal bonding: a case control study. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 2017; 210: 212–16.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lucas, DN, Gough, KL. Enhanced recovery in obstetrics: a new frontier? Int J Obstet Anesth 2013; 22: 92–5.Google ScholarPubMed
Wrench, IJ, Allison, A, Galimberti, A, Radley, S, Wilson, MJ. Introduction of enhanced recovery for elective caesarean section enabling next day discharge: a tertiary centre experience. Int J Obstet Anesth 2015; 24: 124–30.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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