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II - Normal pregnancy and delivery

from Section 2 - Pregnancy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 April 2019

Róisín Monteiro
Affiliation:
Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals’ NHS Trust
Marwa Salman
Affiliation:
Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust
Surbhi Malhotra
Affiliation:
Chelsea and Westminster Hospital
Steve Yentis
Affiliation:
Chelsea and Westminster Hospital
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Analgesia, Anaesthesia and Pregnancy
A Practical Guide
, pp. 23 - 96
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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Further reading

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Further reading

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Further reading

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Further reading

Littleford, J. Effects on the fetus and newborn of maternal analgesia and anesthesia: a review. Can J Anaesth 2004; 51: 586609.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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Further reading

Hinova, A, Fernando, R. Systemic remifentanil for labor analgesia. Anesth Analg 2009; 109: 1925–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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Further reading

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Further reading

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