Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-66nw2 Total loading time: 0.198 Render date: 2021-11-30T06:31:29.661Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }
This chapter is part of a book that is no longer available to purchase from Cambridge Core

Preface to the Second Edition

Simon Bricker
Affiliation:
Countess of Chester Hospital
Get access

Summary

The emphasis, if not the content, of the Final FRCA science viva is changing. In response to muted criticism that an otherwise good exam has been diminished by a basic science viva that at times seemed to be little more than ‘Primary Lite’, the College has introduced greater clinical focus. This has meant that many of the answers that appeared in the first edition needed some reorientation. Yet, as before, this book's prime purpose remains to give you a wide range of potential questions presented in a way that is relevant to the exam that you are facing, and organized so that the information is manageable. As before, the introduction still aims to give you some insight into how the clinical science viva works, together with some revised general guidance as to how to improve your chances of success.

The examination questions continue to be divided broadly into the four subject areas of anatomy, physiology, pharmacology and physics, although the increased clinical emphasis can mean that the distinction between the subject areas can be somewhat blurred. The anatomy question on the internal jugular vein, for example, may well include some discussion of the physiology of central venous pressure. Equally, some questions on pharmacology may encompass aspects of physiology with which there is obvious potential for overlap. This means that you may not always find all the necessary information within one single answer, but should find most of it covered in other sections.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×