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8 - Soft and Hard Socialism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 October 2020

Susana Nuccetelli
Affiliation:
St Cloud State University, Minnesota
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Summary

The twentieth century saw a renewed interest among Latin America’s philosophical thinkers on questions concerning social justice, economic underdevelopment, and the imperialist threat from industrial powers in the region. After outlining Marxism as a political theory, Chapter 8 first discusses how Latin American political thinkers José Carlos Mariátegui and Ernesto “Che” Guevara introduced their own twists to Marxism in order to solve those questions. The chapter evaluates Mariátegui’s attempted solution, especially as formulated in his account of the problems of “the Indian,” “the land,” and “religion” facing Peru. In the case of Guevara, the chapter looks closely at his “theory of the new human being,” pointing to some major objections facing it. By contrast, for Salvador Allende and Víctor Raúl Haya de la Torre, the two moderate socialists of Latin America discussed here, solutions are attainable within the framework of liberal democracy, with no violent revolution necessary. This chapter critically examines their claims that the cause of Latin America’s failed experiments with democracy resides elsewhere – namely, in the imperialist threat from the United States and other industrial powers.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

Allen, Nicolas. 2018. “Mariátegui’s Heroic Socialism: An Interview with Michael Löwy,” Jacobin, December 15. www.jacobinmag.com/2018/12/jose-carlos-mariategui-seven-interpretive-essays-peru-marxism-revolutionary-mythGoogle Scholar
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  • Soft and Hard Socialism
  • Susana Nuccetelli, St Cloud State University, Minnesota
  • Book: An Introduction to Latin American Philosophy
  • Online publication: 15 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781107705562.009
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To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Soft and Hard Socialism
  • Susana Nuccetelli, St Cloud State University, Minnesota
  • Book: An Introduction to Latin American Philosophy
  • Online publication: 15 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781107705562.009
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Soft and Hard Socialism
  • Susana Nuccetelli, St Cloud State University, Minnesota
  • Book: An Introduction to Latin American Philosophy
  • Online publication: 15 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781107705562.009
Available formats
×