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10 - Skepticism and Anti-Skepticism About Latin American Philosophy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 October 2020

Susana Nuccetelli
Affiliation:
St Cloud State University, Minnesota
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Summary

Chapter 10 argues that Latin American philosophy, when broadly construed to include the philosophical thought of a number of academic and nonacademic philosophers, is a type of applied philosophy devoted to issues related to Latin America. Philosophical inquiry into its issues has resulted in the development of a number of ‘isms,’ as illustrated by the chapters in the present book. Some are homegrown ‘isms,’ others amount to novel twists on well-known doctrines of Western philosophy. Many concern matters of practical ethics and social and political philosophy, such as Lascasianism, Arielism, Bolivarism, modest and immodest feminism, republicanism, positivism, Marxism, and liberationism. There are also meta-philosophical ‘isms,’ such as originalism and perspectivism. Evidence from these ‘isms’ helps debunk a number of skeptical positions about Latin American philosophy that are reviewed in this chapter (by Frondizi, Cannabrava, Pereda, Hurtado, Rabossi, and Ezcurdia among others). But not all the anti-skeptics succeed in making a strong case for their view, as shown in the analysis of Zea’s perspectivism and Gracia’s ethnic-philosophy view. More plausible than any of these is the applied-philosophy view of the author – or so she argues here.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

Corlett, J. Angelo. 2007. “Race, Ethnicity, and Public Policy,” pp. 225247 in Race or Ethnicity? On Black and Latino identity, ed. Jorge, J. Gracia., E Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Frondizi, Risieri. 1949. “Is There an Ibero-American Philosophy?Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 9: 345355.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gooding-Williams, Robert. 2002. “Comment on J. J. E. Gracia’s Hispanic/Latino Identity,” Philosophy and Social Criticism 27(2): 310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gracia, Jorge J. E. 2008. Latinos in America: Philosophy and Social Identity. Oxford: Blackwell.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hurtado, Guillermo. 2006. “Two Models of Latin American Philosophy,” Journal of Speculative Philosophy 3: 204213.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pereda, Carlos. 2006. “Latin American Philosophy: Some Vices, Journal of Speculative Philosophy 3: 192203.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Miró Quesada, Francisco. 1978. “Posibilidad y límites de una filosofía lationamericana,” Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad de Costa Rica XVI (43): 7582.Google Scholar
Nuccetelli, Susana. 2018. “Latino Philosophy,” in Stavans, Illan, ed., Oxford Handbook of Latino Studies. DOI:10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190691202.001.0001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rabossi, Eduardo. 2008. En el comienzo Dios creo el Canon. Biblia berolinensis. Ensayos sobre la condición de la filosofía. Buenos Aires: Gedisa.Google Scholar
Stavans, Ilan. 2000. “Life in the Hyphen,” pp. 326 in The Essential Ilan Stavans. New York and London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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