Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-t82dr Total loading time: 0.447 Render date: 2021-12-05T05:08:47.167Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

9 - Liberation Theology and Philosophy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 October 2020

Susana Nuccetelli
Affiliation:
St Cloud State University, Minnesota
Get access

Summary

During the second half of the twentieth century, some Latin American intellectuals put theology and philosophy at the service of explaining and solving the social and economic disparities facing the region. Paradigm results of this development were the liberation theology of Gustavo Gutiėrrez and the liberation philosophy of Enrique Dussel. Chapter 9 considers these attempts to establish the causes of oppression and become the voice of a vaguely defined group of people, the Latin American poor. Other categories of liberation theology and philosophy examined here include the center-periphery distinction and the very notion of liberation, which are adaptations of categories from dependency theory and Marxism respectively. The chapter argues that neither liberation theology nor liberation philosophy can accommodate strong intuitions about justice. They also rely on discredited assumptions from dependency theory. In addition, liberation philosophy faces some problems of its own, since it makes misleading and often false claims about events and rival philosophical theories. To illustrate these problems, the chapter looks closely at Dussel’s claim that all Western philosophy suffers from ideological contamination.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Arroyo Luna, Alejandro F. and Lima Rocha., Orlando 2013. Filosofía en América Latina (website). August 12. http://filosamericalatina.blogspot.com/Google Scholar
Boff, Leonardo. 1995.“Science, Technology, Power, and Liberation Theology,” pp. 123130 in Ecology and Liberation: A New Paradigm. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis.Google Scholar
Cerutti Guldberg, Horacio.1998. “Liberation Philosophy,” in Craig, E, ed., Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy. London: Routledge. www.rep.routledge.com/article/ZA011.Google Scholar
Cerutti Guldberg, Horacio. 1983. Filosofia de la liberación latinoamericana. Mexico City: Fondo de Cultura Económica, available online at https://enriquedussel.com/txt/Textos_200_Obras/Filosofos_Mexico/Filosofia_liberacion-Horacio_Cerutti.PDFGoogle Scholar
Devés Valdés, Eduardo. 2000. “Antecedentes del proyecto modernizador cepalino,” in Del Ariel de Rodó a la CEPAL (1900–1950). Buenos Aires: Biblos, pp. 287304.Google Scholar
Dussel, Enrique. 1978. Ethics and the Theology of Liberation. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis.Google Scholar
Dussel, Enrique. 1996. “Note on Liberation Theology,” pp. 275286 in Bethell (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garrard-Burnett, Virginia, Freston, Paul, and Dove, Stephen C., eds. 2016. The Cambridge History of Religions in Latin America. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gutiérrez, Gustavo. 1973/1971. A Theology of Liberation. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis (references to excerpts pp. 93106 in Márquez 2008).Google Scholar
Haight, Roger. 1998. “Liberation Theology,” in Craig, E, ed., Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy. London: Routledge. www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/liberation-theology/v-1A standard, sympathetic account of the emergence of liberation theology as a conjunction of phenomena in the early 1960s. Among these were: (i) the poverty and violence afflicting many people in Latin America, and (ii) the interpretation of Christian theology by priests who were sympathetic to those affected by such conditions. Absent in this outline is any criticism of liberation theology.Google Scholar
Love, Joseph L. 1996. “Economic Ideas and Ideologies in Latin America since 1930,” pp. 207274 in Bethell (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Novak, Michael. 1984. “The Case Against Liberation Theology,” The New York Times Magazine, October 21. www.nytimes.com/1984/10/21/magazine/the-case-against-liberation-theology.htmlGoogle Scholar
Schutte, Ofelia. 1993. Cultural Identity and Social Liberation in Latin American Thought. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
Torres, Camilo. 2016. Camilo Torres Restrepo, profeta de la liberación: antología (teológica) política, eds. López Guzmán, Lorena and Herrera Farfán, Nicolás Armando. Buenos Aires: Editorial El Colectivo.Google Scholar

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×