Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-7c2ld Total loading time: 0.357 Render date: 2021-11-30T04:10:39.199Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

19 - Conclusion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2014

Benjamin C. Jantzen
Affiliation:
Virginia College of Technology
Get access

Summary

Recapitulation

Most of the design arguments appearing in this book can be viewed as variations on a handful of themes already present in Stoic thought by the first century BCE. I’ve been calling these the argument from order, the argument from purpose, the argument from providence, and the argument by analogy (see Chapter 3). Though I often refer to them in the singular, each is really a family of arguments united by a common schema, a logical form with placeholders for premises that can be filled in a variety of ways. So to be more precise in this review, I’ll refer to the arguments from order, etc.

The arguments by analogy assert that, given all the ways in which the universe resembles a machine, we should conclude that it also resembles a machine in having a designer. This family of arguments was brought into its sharpest focus and then undermined by David Hume (see Chapter 7). The arguments from purpose appeal to natural phenomena, especially the ways in which living things are adapted to their environment, that are supposed to self-evidently exhibit purpose. In Chapter 10, we saw that we must disambiguate senses of ‘purpose’ to avoid begging the question. After all, what we are trying to establish is whether any portion of the natural universe was purposefully arranged by a designing intelligence. But when this is done the argument collapses – it is not the case that the sort of ‘purpose’ which can be observed in the natural world entails or even suggests design.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2014

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Conclusion
  • Benjamin C. Jantzen, Virginia College of Technology
  • Book: An Introduction to Design Arguments
  • Online publication: 05 June 2014
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511793882.021
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Conclusion
  • Benjamin C. Jantzen, Virginia College of Technology
  • Book: An Introduction to Design Arguments
  • Online publication: 05 June 2014
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511793882.021
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Conclusion
  • Benjamin C. Jantzen, Virginia College of Technology
  • Book: An Introduction to Design Arguments
  • Online publication: 05 June 2014
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511793882.021
Available formats
×