Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-6c8bd87754-l85xb Total loading time: 0.58 Render date: 2022-01-21T00:10:59.122Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

5 - Robot Machines and Civil Liability

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 July 2020

Martin Ebers
Affiliation:
Humboldt University of Berlin and University of Tartu
Susana Navas
Affiliation:
Autonomous University of Barcelona
Get access

Summary

The legal consideration of a robot machine as a ‘product’ has led to the application of civil liability rules for producers. Nevertheless, some aspects of the relevant European regulation suggest special attention should be devoted to a review in this field in relation to robotics. Types of defect, the meanings of the term ‘producer’, the consumer expectation test and non-pecuniary damages are some of the aspects that could give rise to future debate. The inadequacy of the current Directive 85/374/EEC for regulating damages caused by robots, particularly those with self-learning capability, is highlighted by the document ‘Follow up to the EU Parliament Resolution of 16 February 2017 on Civil Law Rules on Robotics’. Other relevant documents are the Report on “Liability for AI and other emerging digital technologies” prepared by the Expert Group on Liability and New Technologies, the “Report on the safety and liability implications of Artificial Intelligence, the Internet of Things and Robotics” [COM(2020) 64 final, 19.2.2020] and the White Paper “On Artificial Intelligence – A European approach to excellence and trust” [COM(2020) 65 final, 19.2.2020].

Type
Chapter
Information
Algorithms and Law , pp. 157 - 173
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×