Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-5rkl9 Total loading time: 0.683 Render date: 2022-12-02T19:08:04.627Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Part III - Cultivating (New) Black Readers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 March 2022

Eve Dunbar
Affiliation:
Vassar College, New York
Ayesha K. Hardison
Affiliation:
University of Kansas
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

References

Baker, Houston A. Blues, Ideology, and Afro-American Literature: A Vernacular Theory. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bone, Robert. Preface to the Atheneum Edition. In Negro Poetry and Drama and The Negro in American Fiction. n.p. 1937. New York: Atheneum Press, 1972.Google Scholar
Brawley, Benjamin. The Negro Genius: A New Appraisal of the Achievement of the American Negro in Literature and the Fine Arts. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1937.Google Scholar
Brooks, Van Wyck. America’s Coming-of-Age. New York: B. W. Huebsch, 1915.Google Scholar
Brown, Sterling A. Outline for the Study of the Poetry of American Negroes. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1931.Google Scholar
Brown, Sterling A. Negro Poetry and Drama. 1937. New York: Atheneum Press, 1972.Google Scholar
Brown, Sterling A.Book Review: The Negro Genius by Benjamin Brawley.” Opportunity 15, no. 9 (September 1937): 280281.Google Scholar
Brown, Sterling A. A Son’s Return: Selected Essays of Sterling A. Brown. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1996.Google Scholar
Brown, Sterling A., Davis, Arthur P., and Lee, Ulysses, eds., The Negro Caravan. New York: Dryden Press, 1941.Google Scholar
Cain, Rudolph Alexander Kofi. Alain LeRoy Locke: Race, Culture, and the Education of African American Adults. New York: Rodopi Press, 2003.Google Scholar
Calverton, V. F. An Anthology of American Negro Literature. New York: The Modern Library, 1929.Google Scholar
Chabot, C. Barry. Writers for the Nation: American Literary Modernism. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1997.Google Scholar
Cromwell, Otelia, Turner, Lorenzo Dow, and Dykes, Eva B., eds. Readings from Negro Authors: For Schools and Colleges. New York: Harcourt, Brace, and Co., 1931.Google Scholar
Cullen, Countee, ed. Caroling Dusk: An Anthology of Verse by Negro Poets. New York: Harper & Row, 1927.Google Scholar
Dickson-Carr, Darryl. “African American Literature and the Great Depression.” In The Cambridge History of African American Literature, eds. Graham, Maryemma and W. Ward, Jerry, 288310. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ford, Nick Aaron. The Contemporary Negro Novel: A Study in Race Relations. 1936. College Park, MD: McGrath Publishing Company, 1968.Google Scholar
Gates, Jr., Henry Louis. “Introduction: ‘… and bid him sing’: J. Saunders Redding and the Criticism of American Negro Literature.” In Redding, J. Saunders, To Make a Poet Black, viixxiv. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1988.Google Scholar
Gates, Henry Louis The Signifying Monkey: A Theory of Afro-American Literary Criticism. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.Google Scholar
Gates, Jr., Henry Louis, and Jarrett, Gene Andrew, eds. The New Negro: Readings on Race, Representation, and African American Culture, 1892–1938. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2007.Google Scholar
Gloster, Hugh M. Negro Voices in American Fiction. New York: Russell & Russell, 1948.Google Scholar
Green, Elizabeth Lay. The Negro in Contemporary American Literature. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1928.Google Scholar
Gross, Seymour L.Introduction: Stereotype to Archetype: The Negro in American Literary Criticism.” In Images of the Negro in American Literature, eds. Gross, Seymour L. and Hardy, John Edward, 128. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1966.Google Scholar
Gross, Seymour L., and Hardy, John Edward, eds. Images of the Negro in American Literature. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1966.Google Scholar
Harris, Trudier. Fiction and Folklore: The Novels of Toni Morrison. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Hughes, Langston. “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain.” 1926. Reprinted in The Norton Anthology of African American Literature, 3rd ed., vol. 1, eds. Gates, Henry Louis and Smith, Valerie, 13201324. New York: W.W. Norton and Company, 2014.Google Scholar
Jackson, Lawrence P.African American Literature: Foundational Scholarship, Criticism, and Theory.” In The Cambridge History of African American Literature, eds. Graham, Maryemma and Ward, Jerry W., 703729. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jackson, Lawrence P. The Indignant Generation: A Narrative History of African American Writers and Critics, 1934–1960. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2011.Google Scholar
Johnson, James Weldon. “Preface to the First Edition.” In Book of American Negro Poetry, revised ed. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1931, 39.Google Scholar
Karenga, Maulana Ron.Black Art: Mute Matter Given Force and Function.” 1968. In New Black Voices: An Anthology of Contemporary Afro-American Literature, ed. Chapman, Abraham, 476482. New York: New American Library, 1972.Google Scholar
Locke, Alain. “The Negro in American Culture.” 1928. Reprinted in Black Voices: An Anthology of Afro-American Literature, ed. Chapman, Abraham, 523538. New York: Mentor Books, 1968.Google Scholar
Locke, AlainThe Negro Spirituals.” In The New Negro: An Interpretation, 199213. New York: Albert and Charles Boni, Inc., 1925.Google Scholar
Locke, AlainThe New Negro.” The New Negro: An Interpretation, 316. New York: Albert & Charles Boni, Inc., 1925.Google Scholar
Loggins, Vernon. The Negro Author: His Development in America. New York: Columbia University Press, 1931.Google Scholar
Miller, James. “African-American Writing of the 1930s: A Prologue.” In Radical Revisions: Reading 1930s Culture, eds. Mullen, Bill and Linkon, Sherry, 703729. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1996.Google Scholar
Myrdal, Gunnar. An American Dilemma: The Negro Problem and Modern Democracy. New York: Harper and Row, 1944.Google Scholar
Redding, J. Saunders. “The Black Arts Movement in Negro Poetry.” The American Scholar 42, no. 2 (1973): 330336.Google Scholar
Redding, J.Saunders To Make a Poet Black. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1988.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, Shawn Michelle. “‘Looking at One’s Self Through the Eyes of Others’: W.E.B. Du Bois’s Photographs for the 1900 Paris Exposition.” African American Review 34, no. 4 (Winter 2000): 581599.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stewart, Jeffrey C. The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke. New York: Oxford University Press, 2018.Google Scholar
Stubblefield, Harold W., and Keane, Patrick. Adult Education in the American Experience: From the Colonial Period to the Present. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1994.Google Scholar
Tidwell, John Edgar, and Wright, John S.. “‘Steady and Unaccusing’: An Interview with Sterling A. Brown.” In After Winter: The Art and Life of Sterling A. Brown, eds. Tidwell, John Edgar and Tracy, Steven C., 353364. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009.Google Scholar
Young, James O. Black Writers of the Thirties. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1973.Google Scholar

References

A Sharecropper’s Letter.” New Challenge 2, no. 2 (Fall 1937): 92.Google Scholar
Abbott’s for August.” Abbott’s Monthly 3, no. 1 (July 1931): 45.Google Scholar
After Four Years.” Abbott’s Monthly 3, no. 1 (July 1931): n.p.Google Scholar
Brawley, Benjamin. “The Promise of Negro Literature.” Journal of Negro History 19, no. 1 (January 1934): 5359.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brown, Sterling A.Imitation of Life: Once a Pancake.” In “The Literary Scene: Chronicle and Comment.Opportunity 13, no. 3 (March 1935): 8788.Google Scholar
Brown, Sterling A.Insight, Courage, and Craftsmanship.” In “New Books on Our Bookshelf.” Opportunity 18, no. 6 (June 1940): 185186.Google Scholar
Brown, Sterling A.Mr. Sterling A. Brown.” In “The Literary Scene: Chronicle and Comment.” Opportunity 13, no. 4 (April 1935): 121122.Google Scholar
Brown, Sterling A.Not Without Laughter.” In “Our Book Shelf.Opportunity 8, no. 9 (September 1930): 279280.Google Scholar
Brown, Sterling A.Our Literary Audience.” Opportunity 8, no. 2 (February 1930): 4244.Google Scholar
Casimir, J. R. Ralph. “Letters from Readers.” The Crisis 42, no. 4 (April 1935): 123.Google Scholar
Christian, Shawn Anthony. The Harlem Renaissance and the Idea of a New Negro Reader. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2016.Google Scholar
Contents.” Challenge 1, no. 5 (June 1936): 2.Google Scholar
Contents.” New Challenge 2, no. 2 (Fall 1937): 2.Google Scholar
Correspondence.” In “The Literary Scene: Chronicle and Comment.” Opportunity 13, no. 5 (May 1935): 153154.Google Scholar
Curtright, Wesley. “The Negro and Union Labor.” The Crisis 42, no. 6 (June 1935): 183.Google Scholar
Daniel, Walter C. Black Journals of the United States. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1985.Google Scholar
Danky, James. “Reading, Writing, and Resisting: African American Print Culture.” In A History of the Book in America, Vol. 4: Print in Motion: The Expansion of Publishing and Reading in the United States, 1880–1940, eds. Kaestle, Carl and Radway, Janice, 339358. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009.Google Scholar
Dickson-Carr, Darryl. Spoofing the Modern: Satire in the Harlem Renaissance. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2014.Google Scholar
Du Bois, W. E. B.Field and Function of the American Negro College.” In The Education of Black People: Ten Critiques, 1906–1960. Revised edition, ed. Aptheker, Herbert, 111133. New York: Monthly Review Press, 2001.Google Scholar
Du Bois, W. E. B.Toward a New Racial Philosophy.” In “Postscript by W. E. B. Du Bois.” The Crisis 40, no. 1 (January 1933): 2022.Google Scholar
Dunlap, Mollie. “Recreational Reading of Negro College Students.” Journal of Negro Education 2, no. 4 (October 1833): 448459.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Editorial.” New Challenge 2, no. 2 (Fall 1937): 34.Google Scholar
Editorials: An Opportunity Award.” Opportunity 9, no.10 (October 1931): 298.Google Scholar
Editorials: More About the Opportunity Contest.” Opportunity 12, no. 8 (August 1934): 231.Google Scholar
Editorials: The End of A Controversy.” Opportunity 13, no. 8 (August 1935): 231.Google Scholar
Editorials: The Opportunity Literary Award.” Opportunity 11, no. 6 (June 1933): 166.Google Scholar
Gaines, Kevin. Uplifting the Race: Black Leadership, Politics, and Culture in the Twentieth Century. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gardner, Eric, and Moody, Joycelyn. “Introduction: Black Periodical Studies.” American Periodicals: A Journal of History & Criticism 25, no. 2 (2015): 105–11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hill, Valdemar. “Jessie’s Mother.” New Challenge 2, no. 2 (Fall 1937): 1825.Google Scholar
Hudson, Alva. “Reading Achievements, Interests, and Habits of Negro Women.” Journal of Negro Education 1, no. 3–4 (1932): 367373.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hurst, Fannie. “Miss Fannie Hurst.” In “The Literary Scene: Chronicle and Comment.” Opportunity 13, no. 4 (April 1935): 121.Google Scholar
Jarrett, Gene Andrew. Deans and Truants: Race and Realism in African American Literature. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006.Google Scholar
Johnson, James Weldon. Preface to the Second Edition. Book of American Negro Poetry. New York: Harcourt, Brace, and Company, 1931.Google Scholar
Knott, Cheryl. Not Free, Not for All: Public Libraries in the Age of Jim Crow. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2015.Google ScholarPubMed
Locke, Alain. “Dry Fields and Green Pastures—Part II.” Opportunity 18, no. 2 (February 1940): 410, 28.Google Scholar
Locke, AlainThe Eleventh Hour of Nordicism: Retrospective Review of Literature of the Negro for 1934.” Opportunity 13, no. 1 (January 1935): 812.Google Scholar
Locke, AlainThe Negro: ‘New’ and Newer: A Retrospective Review of the Literature for 1938.” Opportunity 17, no. 1 (January 1939): 410.Google Scholar
Locke, AlainWe Turn to Prose: A Retrospective Review of Literature of the Negro for 1931.” Opportunity 10, no. 2 (February 1932): 4044.Google Scholar
McGann, Jerome. The Textual Condition. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1991.Google Scholar
McHenry, Elizabeth. Forgotten Readers: Recovering the Lost History of African American Literary Societies. Chapel Hill, NC: Duke University Press, 2002.Google Scholar
Minus, Marian. “Present Trends of Negro Literature,” New Challenge: A Literary Quarterly 2, no. 1 (April 1937): 911.Google Scholar
Mullen, Bill. Popular Fronts: Chicago and African-American Cultural Politics, 1935–46. Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 1999.Google Scholar
Pawley, Christine. “Seeking ‘Significance’: Actual Readers, Specific Reading Communities.” Book History 5 (2002): 143160.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peterson, Dorothy. “Book Review ‘Black Thunder.’” Challenge 1, no. 5 (June 1936): 4546.Google Scholar
Prize Winners,” Abbott’s Monthly 3, no. 2 (August 1931): n.p.Google Scholar
Redmond, Eugene. “Stridency and the Sword: Literary and Cultural Emphasis in Afro-American Magazines.” In The Little Magazine in America: A Modern Documentary History, eds. Anderson, Elliott and Kinzie, Mary, 538573. New York: Pushcart Press, 1978.Google Scholar
Schreiber, Rachel. Modern Print Activism. New York: Routledge, 2013.Google Scholar
The Negro and Union Labor.” The Crisis 42, no. 6 (June 1935): 183.Google Scholar
The Outer Pocket.” The Crisis 37, no. 6 (June 1930): 197198.Google Scholar
This Month,” The Crisis 39, no. 11 (November 1932): 339.Google Scholar
Thompson, Isabel. “Ebony.” Opportunity 9, no. 10 (October 1931): 312314.Google Scholar
U.S. Census, 1930: Vol. II, Population: Chapter 2 Color or Race, Nativity and Parentage. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1933.Google Scholar
U.S. Census, 1940: Population Vol. II: Characteristics of the Population. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1943.Google Scholar
West, Dorothy. “Dear Reader.” Challenge 1, no. 1 (March 1934): 39.Google Scholar
West, DorothyDear Reader.” Challenge 1, no. 4 (January 1936): 4647.Google Scholar
West, DorothyDear Reader.” Challenge 1, no. 5 (June 1936): 4647.Google Scholar
West, DorothyDear Reader.” Challenge 2, no. 1 (April 1937): 4041.Google Scholar
West, DorothyVoicesChallenge 1, no. 5 (June 1936): 4748.Google Scholar
White, Joy. “For Betty’s Sake.” Abbott’s Monthly 4, no. 5 (May 1932): 4445, 6164.Google Scholar
Wilson, Sondra Kathryn. In Search of Democracy: The NAACP Writings of James Weldon Johnson, Walter White, and Roy Wilkins 1920–1977. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.Google Scholar
Wright, Richard. “Blueprint for Negro Writing.New Challenge: A Literary Quarterly 2, no. 2 (Fall 1937): 5365.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×