Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-vl2kb Total loading time: 0.236 Render date: 2021-12-05T21:24:31.975Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

4 - Unconscious transference and lineup identification: Toward a memory blending approach

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 August 2010

David Frank Ross
Affiliation:
Boise State University, Idaho
J. Don Read
Affiliation:
University of Lethbridge, Alberta
Michael P. Toglia
Affiliation:
State University of New York
Get access

Summary

In 1983 Lenell Geter was given a life sentence for a series of armed robberies that he did not commit. After serving eighteen months in prison, he was released when new evidence revealed that another man committed the crimes. An investigation into the case showed that the prosecution's key witness had made a tragic error. The police had shown the witness a photo lineup shortly after the crime occurred. At that time the witness reported that the assailant was not present in the lineup. Several months later the same witness was shown another lineup. It contained five photographs, four new photographs, and one photograph that had been present in the first lineup. The witness selected the “old” or “familiar” photograph, and the person in the photograph was Lenell Geter. Apparently the witness did not remember having seen Geter's photograph in the first lineup, and as a result she incorrectly associated its familiarity with the crime, and made a false identification (Buckhout, 1984). In a similar case, a ticket agent in a railroad station was the victim of an armed robbery (Houts, 1963; Loftus, 1976; Read, Tollestrup, Hammersley, McFadzen, & Christensen, 1990). From a police lineup the ticket agent identified a sailor who had proof that he could not have been at the station at the time of the robbery. When questioned as to why he misidentified the sailor, the ticket agent claimed the sailor looked familiar to him. An investigation discovered that the sailor lived near the train station, and had purchased tickets from the agent at three different times prior to the robbery.

Type
Chapter
Information
Adult Eyewitness Testimony
Current Trends and Developments
, pp. 80 - 100
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1994

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
10
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×