Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-jqctd Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-02-29T11:52:19.151Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

8 - The COME-ON/ADONIS systems

from Part three - Adaptive optics with natural guide stars

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 November 2009

Gérard Rousset
Affiliation:
Office National d'Études et de Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA), France
Jean-Luc Beuzit
Affiliation:
Observatoire de Grenoble, France
François Roddier
Affiliation:
University of Hawaii, Manoa
Get access

Summary

Introduction to the COME-ON program

In the mid 1980s several programs were undertaken in astronomy to implement adaptive optics (AO) for visible (Doel et al. 1990; Acton and Smithson 1992) and infrared (IR) (Merkle and Léna 1986; Beckers et al. 1986) imaging. Those were stimulated by the coming new generation of very large telescopes of diameter D around 8 m (Barr 1986) and by the availability of AO components developed by defense programs (see for instance: Hardy et al. 1977; Pearson 1979; Gaffard et al. 1984; Fontanella 1985; Parenti 1988). Initiated by P. Léna, F. Merkle, and J.-C. Fontanella on the basis of the existing competences in France and at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), the COME-ON project was started in 1986 with the aim of demonstrating the performance of AO for astronomy. The consortium in charge of the project was initially made of three French laboratories associated with ESO, COME-ON standing for: CGE, a French company now CILAS (formerly LASERDOT), Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, ESO and ONERA. The purpose of the project was initially to build an AO-prototype system based on the available technologies and test it at an astronomical site, in order to gather experience for the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) program, including multi-telescope interferometry with the VLT interferometer (VLTI). The main requirement was to achieve nearly diffraction-limited imaging at the focus of a 4-m class telescope at near IR wavelengths from 2 to 5 μm, depending on the seeing conditions.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1999

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×