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Chapter 2 - What to Do First

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 October 2019

Mary Carter Denny
Affiliation:
Georgetown University Hospital
Ahmad Riad Ramadan
Affiliation:
Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit
Sean I. Savitz
Affiliation:
University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
James Grotta
Affiliation:
Memorial Hermann Texas Medical School
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Summary

The following initial measures apply to all stroke patients. They are necessary to stabilize and assess the patient, and prepare for definitive therapy. All current and, probably, future stroke therapies for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke are best implemented as fast as possible, so these things need to be done quickly. This is the general order to do things, but in reality, in order to speed the process, these measures are usually dealt with simultaneously. They are best addressed in the ED, where urgent care pathways for stroke should be established and part of the routine (see Chapter 14).

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Chapter
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Acute Stroke Care , pp. 7 - 11
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Powers, WJ, Rabinstein, AA, Ackerson, T, et al.; American Heart Association Stroke Council. 2018 guidelines for the early management of patients with acute ischemic stroke: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. Stroke 2018; 49: e46e110.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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