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Chapter 16 - Transition to Outpatient Stroke Care

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 October 2019

Mary Carter Denny
Affiliation:
Georgetown University Hospital
Ahmad Riad Ramadan
Affiliation:
Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit
Sean I. Savitz
Affiliation:
University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
James Grotta
Affiliation:
Memorial Hermann Texas Medical School
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Summary

It is never too early to begin to educate the patient and family about lifestyle changes and medical treatments to prevent another stroke. These need to be reinforced throughout the hospital and rehabilitation stay, and in the outpatient stroke clinic.

After a major stroke, both the family and the patient go through a grief reaction that at first includes denial and disbelief, and sometimes anger. In particular, the need to insert a PEG is often a crisis point when the family finally comes to terms with the severe disability and prolonged recovery that lies ahead. At this stage, which is usually when the patient is in the acute stroke unit, mainly supportive measures are indicated.

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Chapter
Information
Acute Stroke Care , pp. 237 - 240
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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