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4 - Pursuing organizational and cultural change

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 November 2009

Michael A. Geheb
Affiliation:
Professor of Medicine and Vice President Institutional Advancement at Oregon Health & Science University
Mark L. Penkhus
Affiliation:
Senior Vice President and Chief Development Officer Sheridan Healthcorp
Peter O. Kohler
Affiliation:
President Oregon Health & Science University
Arthur Garson
Affiliation:
Vice President and Dean of the School of Medicine University of Virginia
Jonathan F. Saxton
Affiliation:
Health Policy Analyst Emory University
Michael M. E. Johns
Affiliation:
Executive Vice President Health Affairs at Emory University; Chief Executive Officer Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center
George F. Sheldon
Affiliation:
Professor of Surgery and Social Medicine and former Chair of Surgery University of North Carolina
Don Detmer
Affiliation:
University of Virginia
Elaine Steen
Affiliation:
University of Virginia
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Summary

Introduction

The academic physician, academic medicine, and the health professions in general are in the midst of an extended period of organizational and professional turbulence. Beginning with the explosive growth of managed care in the 1980s, the relatively closed, professionally self-regulated health services sector has been pushed into a more classically competitive marketplace. The 1990s brought additional impetus for change with shifting public policy, changing demographics, increasing consumerism, and the growing influence of information technologies. Further, the turn of the century brought renewed public concern with deficiencies and inconsistencies in the quality of health care services.

The health care sector is clearly laboring under the strains of this changing and demanding environment. The new marketplace is squeezing the financial resources and compensation available to health professionals and organizations. Societal needs, expectations, and aspirations for the health care system have changed and are growing. Academic health centers (AHCs), in particular, continue to face great challenges in adapting their multiple service and academic missions to changing societal, financial, and service requirements.

Academic health centers have adopted measures to improve service, cut costs, and increase productivity. They are learning how to do more with less. They have also worked to develop new capabilities and revenue streams in an attempt to shore-up strained academic and clinical resources. These efforts increase the service and performance expectations for faculty and staff who find it increasingly difficult to pursue research and teaching goals.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Academic Health Center
Leadership and Performance
, pp. 119 - 187
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2005

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  • Pursuing organizational and cultural change
    • By Michael A. Geheb, Professor of Medicine and Vice President Institutional Advancement at Oregon Health & Science University, Mark L. Penkhus, Senior Vice President and Chief Development Officer Sheridan Healthcorp, Peter O. Kohler, President Oregon Health & Science University, Arthur Garson, Vice President and Dean of the School of Medicine University of Virginia, Jonathan F. Saxton, Health Policy Analyst Emory University, Michael M. E. Johns, Executive Vice President Health Affairs at Emory University; Chief Executive Officer Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center, George F. Sheldon, Professor of Surgery and Social Medicine and former Chair of Surgery University of North Carolina
  • Edited by Don Detmer, University of Virginia, Elaine Steen, University of Virginia
  • Book: The Academic Health Center
  • Online publication: 12 November 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511543487.006
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  • Pursuing organizational and cultural change
    • By Michael A. Geheb, Professor of Medicine and Vice President Institutional Advancement at Oregon Health & Science University, Mark L. Penkhus, Senior Vice President and Chief Development Officer Sheridan Healthcorp, Peter O. Kohler, President Oregon Health & Science University, Arthur Garson, Vice President and Dean of the School of Medicine University of Virginia, Jonathan F. Saxton, Health Policy Analyst Emory University, Michael M. E. Johns, Executive Vice President Health Affairs at Emory University; Chief Executive Officer Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center, George F. Sheldon, Professor of Surgery and Social Medicine and former Chair of Surgery University of North Carolina
  • Edited by Don Detmer, University of Virginia, Elaine Steen, University of Virginia
  • Book: The Academic Health Center
  • Online publication: 12 November 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511543487.006
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Pursuing organizational and cultural change
    • By Michael A. Geheb, Professor of Medicine and Vice President Institutional Advancement at Oregon Health & Science University, Mark L. Penkhus, Senior Vice President and Chief Development Officer Sheridan Healthcorp, Peter O. Kohler, President Oregon Health & Science University, Arthur Garson, Vice President and Dean of the School of Medicine University of Virginia, Jonathan F. Saxton, Health Policy Analyst Emory University, Michael M. E. Johns, Executive Vice President Health Affairs at Emory University; Chief Executive Officer Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center, George F. Sheldon, Professor of Surgery and Social Medicine and former Chair of Surgery University of North Carolina
  • Edited by Don Detmer, University of Virginia, Elaine Steen, University of Virginia
  • Book: The Academic Health Center
  • Online publication: 12 November 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511543487.006
Available formats
×