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Generation of large pig and bovine blastocysts by culturing in human induced pluripotent stem cell medium

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 April 2015

Qing-Shan Gao
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133000, China.
Long Jin
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133000, China.
Suo Li
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133000, China.
Hai-Ying Zhu
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133000, China.
Qing Guo
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133000, China.
Xiao-Chen Li
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133000, China.
Qing-Guo Jin
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133000, China.
Jin-Dan Kang
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133000, China.
Chang-Guo Yan
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133000, China.
Xi-Jun Yin
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133000, China.
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Summary

We investigated the effect of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPS) medium on porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer and bovine in vitro fertilized early blastocysts, in comparison with North Carolina State University (NCSU)-37 medium and in vitro culture (IVC)-II medium. After 2 days of culture, the diameter of the portion of the blastocyst that was extruded from the zona pellucid dramatically differed between porcine blastocysts cultured in hiPS medium and those cultured in NCSU-37 medium (221.47 ± 38.94 μm versus 481.87 ± 40.61 μm, P < 0.01). Moreover, the diameter of the portion of the blastocyst significantly differed between bovine blastocysts cultured in hiPS medium and those cultured in IVC-II medium (150.30 ± 29.49 μm versus 195.58 ± 41.59 μm, P < 0.01). Furthermore, the total number of cells per porcine and bovine blastocyst was more than two-fold higher in blastocysts cultured in hiPS medium than in those cultured in NCSU-37 medium (44.33 ± 5.28 and 143.33 ± 16.05, P < 0.01) or IVC-II medium (172.12 ± 45.08 and 604.83 ± 242.64, P < 0.01), respectively. These results indicate that hiPS medium markedly improves the quality of porcine and bovine blastocysts.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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