Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-dxfhg Total loading time: 0.723 Render date: 2021-02-25T17:59:54.234Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Article contents

First meiosis of early dictyate nuclei from primordial oocytes in mature and activated mouse oocytes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 September 2008

Renata Czolowska
Affiliation:
Department of Embryology, Institute of Zoology, University of Warsaw, Poland.
Andrzej K. Tarkowski
Affiliation:
Department of Embryology, Institute of Zoology, University of Warsaw, Poland.

Summary

Nuclei of diplotene (dictyate) primordial oocytes (PO) were transferred to metaphase II oocytes and to activated mouse oocytes using cell fusion techniques. In a metaphase II oocyte, the PO nucleus condenses within 2–3 h to bivalents which become arranged on the first meiotic spindle. After oocyte activation, homologous chromosomes segregate between the oocyte and the first polar body, and a diploid pronucleus-like nucleus reforms from the one set of dyads. This nucleus condenses in the first embryonic mitosis into 40 ‘somatic’ chromosomes which coexist in the common metaphase plate with 20 somatic chromosomes originating from the female pronucleus. Shortening of the time between fusion and activation to about 1 h prevents bivalent differentiation. The PO nucleus condenses only partially and reforms, after oocyte activation, a pronucleus-like nucleus. This nucleus gives rise at the first embryonic mitosis to 20 bivalents which coexist with 20 somatic chromosomes originating from the female pronucleus. A PO nucleus introduced into an activated egg completes the first cell cycle as an intact interphase nucleus. It never condenses in the first embryonic mitosis into bivalents, and undergoes only initial condensation (preceding bivalent differentiation). These results indicate that: (1) condensation into bivalents, meiotic spindle formation and first meiotic division can be greatly accelerated by the introduction of an early diplotene (dictyate) oocyte nucleus into a metaphase II oocyte, and (2) depending on whether the diplotene nucleus enters the first embryonic (mitotic) cell cycle after just initiating or after completing the first meiosis, it gives rise at the first cleavage division to meiotic (bivalents) or ‘somatic’ chromosomes respectively.

Type
Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1996

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Bachvarova, R. (1985). Gene expression during oogenesis and oocyte development in mammals. In Developmental Biology, ed. Browder, L.W., vol. 1, pp. 453524. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
Balakier, H. (1978). Induction of maturation in small oocytes from sexually immature mice by fusion with meiotic or mitotic cells. Exp. Cell Res. 112, 137–41.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Choi, T., Aoki, F., Mori, M., Yamashita, M., Nagahama, Y. & Kohmoto, K. (1991). Activation of p34cdc2 protein kinase activity in meiotic and mitotic cell cycles in mouse oocytes and embryos. Development 113, 789–95.Google ScholarPubMed
Cuthbertson, K.S.R. (1983). Parthenogenetic activation of mouse oocytes with ethanol and benzyl alcohol. J. Exp. Zool. 226, 311–14.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cuthbertson, K.S.R., Whittingham, D.G. & Cobbold, P.H. (1981). Free Ca2+ increases in exponential phases during mouse oocyte activation. Nature 294, 754–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Czolowska, R., Modlinski, J.A. & Tarkowski, A.K. (1984). Behaviour of thymocyte nuclei in non-activated and activated mouse oocytes. J. Cell Sci. 69, 1934.Google ScholarPubMed
Czolowska, R., Szöllösi, D. & Szöllösi, M.S. (1992). Changes in embryonic 8-cell nuclei transferred by means of cell fusion to mouse eggs. Int. J. Dev. Biol. 36, 543–53.Google ScholarPubMed
Donahue, R.P. (1968). Maturation of the mouse oocyte in vitro. I. Sequence and timing of nuclear progression. J. Exp. Zool. 169, 237–50.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Edwards, R.G. & Gates, A.H. (1959). Timing of the stages of the maturation divisions, ovulation, fertilization and the first cleavage of eggs of adult mice treated with gonadotrophins. J. Endocrinol. 18, 292304.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Eichenlaub-Ritter, U. & Boll, I. (1989). Nocodazole sensitivity, age-related aneuploidy, and alterations in the cell cycle during maturation of mouse oocytes. Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 52, 170–6.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fulton, B.P. & Whittingham, D.G. (1978). Activation of mammalian oocytes by intracellular injection of calcium. Nature 273, 149–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hampl, A. & Eppig, J.J. (1995). Translational regulation of the gradual increase in histone H1 kinase activity in maturing mouse oocytes. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 40, 9–15.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hashimoto, N. & Kishimoto, T. (1988). Regulation of meiotic metaphase by a cytoplasmic maturation-promoting factor during mouse oocyte maturation. Dev. Biol. 126, 242–52.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kaufman, M.H. (1983). Early Mammalian Development: Parthenogenetic Studies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Kaufman, M.H. & O'Neill, G.T. (1988). Aneuploidy induced by ethanol. In Aneuploidy, part B, Induction and Test Systems, pp. 95122. New York: Alan R. Liss.Google Scholar
Kubiak, J.Z. & Tarkowski, A.K. (1985). Electrofusion of mouse blastomeres. Exp. Cell Res. 157, 561–6.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mangia, F. & Epstein, C.J. (1975). Biochemical studies of growing mouse oocytes: preparation of oocytes and analysis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activities. Dev. Biol. 45, 211–20.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Masui, Y. & Markert, C.L. (1971). Cytoplasmic control of nuclear behavior during meiotic maturation of frog oocytes. J. Exp. Zool. 177, 129–45.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Meyerhof, P.G. & Masui, Y. (1977). Ca and Mg control of cytostatic factors from Rana pipiens oocytes which cause metaphase and cleavage arrest. Dev. Biol. 61, 214–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meyerhof, P.G. & Masui, Y. (1979 a). Chromosome condensation activity in Rana pipiens eggs matured in vivo and in blastomeres arrested by cytostatic factor (CSF). Exp. Cell Res. 123, 345–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meyerhof, P.G. & Masui, Y. (1979 b). Properties of a cytostatic factor from Xenopus laevis eggs. Dev. Biol. 72, 182–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Murray, A.W., Solomon, M.J. & Kirschner, M.W. (1989). The role of cyclin synthesis and degradation in the control of maturation promoting factor activity. Nature 339, 280–6.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Norbury, C. & Nurse, P. (1992). Animal cell cycles and their control. Annu. Rev. Biochem. 61, 441–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
O'Neill, G.T. & Kaufman, M.H. (1987). Ovulation and fertilization of primary and secondary oocytes in LT/Sv strain mice. Gamete Res. 18, 2736.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Peters, H. (1969). The development of the mouse ovary from birth to maturity. Ada Endocrinol. 62, 98116.Google ScholarPubMed
Polanski, Z. (1986). In-vivo and in-vitro maturation rate of oocytes from two strains of mice. J. Reprod. Fertil. 78, 103–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Szöllösi, D. (1993). Oocyte maturation. In Reproduction in Mammals and Man, ed. Thibault, C., Levasseur, M.C. & Hunter, R.H.F., pp. 307–25. Paris: Ellipses.Google Scholar
Szöllösi, D., Calarco, P. & Donahue, R.P. (1972). Absence of centrioles in the first and second meiotic spindles of mouse oocytes. J. Cell Sci. 11, 521–41.Google ScholarPubMed
Szöllösi, D., Czolowska, R., Szöllösi, M.S. & Tarkowski, A.K. (1986). Remodeling of thymocyte nuclei in activated mouse oocytes: an ultrastructural study. Eur. J. Cell Biol. 42, 140–51.Google Scholar
Szöllosi, D., Czolowska, R., Szöllösi, M.S. & Tarkowski, A.K. (1988). Remodeling of mouse thymocyte nuclei depends on the time of their transfer into activated, homologous oocytes. J. Cell Sci. 91, 603–13.Google Scholar
Tarkowski, A.K. (1966). An air-drying method for chromosome preparations from mouse eggs. Cytogenetics 5, 394400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tarkowski, A.K. & Balakier, H. (1980). Nucleo-cytoplasmic interactions in cell hybrids between mouse oocytes, blastomeres and somatic cells. J. Embryol. Exp. Morphol. 55, 319–30.Google ScholarPubMed
Tarkowski, A.K. & Wroblewska, J. (1967). Development of blastomeres of mouse eggs isolated at the 4- and 8-cell stage. J. Embryol. Exp. Morphol. 18, 155–80.Google ScholarPubMed

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 5 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 25th February 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

First meiosis of early dictyate nuclei from primordial oocytes in mature and activated mouse oocytes
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

First meiosis of early dictyate nuclei from primordial oocytes in mature and activated mouse oocytes
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

First meiosis of early dictyate nuclei from primordial oocytes in mature and activated mouse oocytes
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *