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Eugenol influences the expression of messenger RNAs for superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase 1 in bovine secondary follicles cultured in vitro

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 February 2021

E.M. Vasconcelos
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Programme in Biotechnology, Laboratory of Biotechnology and Physiology of Reproduction (LABIREP), Federal University of Ceará, Av. Comandante Mauricélio Rocha Ponte 100, CEP 62041-040, Sobral, CE, Brazil
F.C. Costa
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Programme in Biotechnology, Laboratory of Biotechnology and Physiology of Reproduction (LABIREP), Federal University of Ceará, Av. Comandante Mauricélio Rocha Ponte 100, CEP 62041-040, Sobral, CE, Brazil
A.V.N. Azevedo
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Programme in Biotechnology, Laboratory of Biotechnology and Physiology of Reproduction (LABIREP), Federal University of Ceará, Av. Comandante Mauricélio Rocha Ponte 100, CEP 62041-040, Sobral, CE, Brazil
P.A.A. Barroso
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Programme in Biotechnology, Laboratory of Biotechnology and Physiology of Reproduction (LABIREP), Federal University of Ceará, Av. Comandante Mauricélio Rocha Ponte 100, CEP 62041-040, Sobral, CE, Brazil
E.I.T. de Assis
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Programme in Biotechnology, Laboratory of Biotechnology and Physiology of Reproduction (LABIREP), Federal University of Ceará, Av. Comandante Mauricélio Rocha Ponte 100, CEP 62041-040, Sobral, CE, Brazil
L.R.F.M. Paulino
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Programme in Biotechnology, Laboratory of Biotechnology and Physiology of Reproduction (LABIREP), Federal University of Ceará, Av. Comandante Mauricélio Rocha Ponte 100, CEP 62041-040, Sobral, CE, Brazil
B.R. Silva
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Programme in Biotechnology, Laboratory of Biotechnology and Physiology of Reproduction (LABIREP), Federal University of Ceará, Av. Comandante Mauricélio Rocha Ponte 100, CEP 62041-040, Sobral, CE, Brazil
A.W.B. Silva
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Programme in Biotechnology, Laboratory of Biotechnology and Physiology of Reproduction (LABIREP), Federal University of Ceará, Av. Comandante Mauricélio Rocha Ponte 100, CEP 62041-040, Sobral, CE, Brazil
A.L.P. Souza
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Programme in Biotechnology, Laboratory of Biotechnology and Physiology of Reproduction (LABIREP), Federal University of Ceará, Av. Comandante Mauricélio Rocha Ponte 100, CEP 62041-040, Sobral, CE, Brazil
J.R.V. Silva*
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Programme in Biotechnology, Laboratory of Biotechnology and Physiology of Reproduction (LABIREP), Federal University of Ceará, Av. Comandante Mauricélio Rocha Ponte 100, CEP 62041-040, Sobral, CE, Brazil
*
Author for correspondence: J. R. V. Silva. Biotechnology Nucleus of Sobral – NUBIS, Federal University of Ceará, Av. Comandante Maurocélio Rocha Ponte 100, CEP 62041-040, Sobral, CE, Brazil. Tel:/Fax: +55 88 36118000. E-mail jrvsilva@ufc.br

Summary

This study aimed to investigate the effects of eugenol on growth, viability, antrum formation and mRNA expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) and peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6) in bovine secondary follicles cultured in vitro. To this end, bovine ovaries were collected from a local slaughterhouse and in the laboratory the follicles were isolated from the ovarian cortex. The follicles were then cultured in TCM-199+ alone or supplemented with different concentrations of eugenol (0.5, 5.0 and 50.0 μM). Follicular diameters and antrum formation were evaluated on days 0, 6, 12 and 18. Viability analysis was performed using calcein and ethidium homodimer. Real-time PCR was used to quantify mRNA levels for SOD, CAT, GPX1 and PRDX6 in cultured follicles. Follicular diameters and mRNA levels in follicles cultured in vitro were compared using analysis of variance and Kruskal–Wallis tests, while follicular survival and antrum formation were compared using the chi-squared test (P < 0.05). The results showed that secondary follicles cultured with eugenol maintained similar morphology and viability to follicles cultured in the control group. A progressive increase in follicular diameter was observed between days 0 and 12 for all treatments, except for follicles cultured with 50 µM eugenol. Eugenol (5.0 and 50.0 μM) increased mRNA levels for GPX1 in cultured follicles, but 0.5 μM eugenol reduced mRNA levels for SOD. The addition of eugenol did not influence mRNA expression for CAT and PRDX6. In conclusion, eugenol supplementation reduces mRNA levels for SOD and increases mRNA levels of GPX1 in bovine secondary follicles cultured in vitro.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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