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Does heat stress provoke the loss of a continuous layer of cortical granules beneath the plasma membrane during oocyte maturation?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 March 2010

C. Andreu-Vázquez
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Heath and Anatomy, Faculty of Veterinary, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Edifici V, Campus UAB, 08193 Barcelona, Spain.
F. López-Gatius
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Production, University of Lleida, Lleida, Spain.
I. García-Ispierto
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Production, University of Lleida, Lleida, Spain.
M.J. Maya-Soriano
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Health and Anatomy, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
R.H.F. Hunter
Affiliation:
Institute of Reproductive Medicine, Hannover Veterinary University, Germany.
M. López-Béjar
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Health and Anatomy, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
Corresponding

Summary

The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of heat stress on bovine oocyte maturation. Both nuclear stage and distribution of cortical granules (CG) were simultaneously evaluated in each oocyte. Oocyte overmaturation under standard conditions of culture was also evaluated. For this purpose, logistic regression procedures were used to evaluate possible effects of factors such as heat stress, overmaturation, replicate, CG distribution and metaphase II (MII) morphology on oocyte maturation. Based on the odds ratio, oocytes on heat stressed (HSO) and overmaturated (OMO) oocyte group were, respectively, 14.5 and 5.4 times more likely to show anomalous MII morphology than those matured under control conditions (CO). The likelihood for an oocyte of showing the CG distribution pattern IV (aging oocyte) was 6.3 and 9.3 times higher for HSO and OMO groups, respectively, than for the CO group. The risk of undergoing anomalous oocyte maturation, considering both nuclear stage and distribution of CG was 17.1 and 18 times greater in oocytes cultured in HSO and OMO groups, respectively, than those in the CO group. In conclusion, heat stress proved to be valuable in aging oocytes. Heat stress advanced age for nuclear and cytoplasmic processes in a similar form to that of oocyte overmaturation.

Type
Research Article
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Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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