Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-p6h7k Total loading time: 0.259 Render date: 2022-05-25T22:15:57.861Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Article contents

Blastocysts derived from adult fibroblasts of a rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) using interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 May 2011

Dae Kee Kwon
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151–742, Republic of Korea.
Jung Taek Kang
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151–742, Republic of Korea.
Sol Ji Park
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151–742, Republic of Korea.
Ma Ninia Limas Gomez
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151–742, Republic of Korea.
Su Jin Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151–742, Republic of Korea.
Mohammad Atikuzzaman
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151–742, Republic of Korea.
Ok Jae Koo
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151–742, Republic of Korea.
Goo Jang
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151–742, Republic of Korea.
Byeong Chun Lee*
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151–742, Republic of Korea.
*
All correspondence to: Byeong Chun Lee. Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151–742, Republic of Korea. Tel: +82 2 880 1269. Fax: +82 2 873 1269. e-mail: bclee@snu.ac.kr

Summary

In non-human primates, it is difficult to collect sufficient numbers of oocytes for producing identical embryos by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Because of this factor, inter-species SCNT (iSCNT) using heterospecific oocytes is an attractive alternative approach. The objective of this study was to produce iSCNT-derived blastocysts using enucleated cow (Bos taurus) metaphase II oocytes and adult rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) fibroblasts. Ear skin tissue from a 6-year-old male rhesus monkey was collected by biopsy and fibroblasts were isolated. Immature cumulus–oocyte complexes from cow ovaries were collected and matured in vitro in Medium 199. The enucleated oocytes were reconstructed with rhesus monkey fibroblasts and iSCNT embryos were cultured in modified synthetic oviduct fluid in an atmosphere of 5–5.5% CO2 under various conditions (37–39 °C and 5–20% O2) to examine the effects of in vitro culture conditions. Most embryos were arrested at the 8- or 16-cell stage and only three blastocysts were derived in this way using iSCNT from a total of 1153 cultured activated embryos (0.26% production rate). Two of the three blastocysts were used for counting nuclear numbers using bisbenzimide staining, which were 51 and 24. The other iSCNT-derived blastocyst was used to analyse mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by PCR, and both rhesus monkey and cow mtDNA were detected. Although the development rate was extremely low, this study established that iSCNT using two phylogenetically distant species, including a primate, could produce blastocysts. With improvements in the development rate, it may be possible to produce rhesus monkey iSCNT-derived embryonic stem cell lines for studies on primate nucleus and cow mitochondria interaction mechanisms.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Beyhan, Z., Iager, A.E. & Cibelli, J.B. (2007). Interspecies nuclear transfer: implications for embryonic stem cell biology. Cell. Stem Cell 1, 502–12.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Byrne, J.A., Pedersen, D.A., Clepper, L.L., Nelson, M., Sanger, W.G., Gokhale, S., Wolf, D.P. & Mitalipov, S.M. (2007). Producing primate embryonic stem cells by somatic cell nuclear transfer. Nature 450, 497502.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chang, K.H., Lim, J.M., Kang, S.K., Lee, B.C., Moon, S.Y. & Hwang, W.S. (2003). Blastocyst formation, karyotype, and mitochondrial DNA of interspecies embryos derived from nuclear transfer of human cord fibroblasts into enucleated bovine oocytes. Fertil. Steril. 80, 1380–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chen, Y., He, Z.X., Liu, A., Wang, K., Mao, W.W., Chu, J.X., Lu, Y., Fang, Z.F., Shi, Y.T., Yang, Q.Z., Chen da, Y., Wang, M.K., Li, J.S., Huang, S.L., Kong, X.Y., Shi, Y.Z., Wang, Z.Q., Xia, J.H., Long, Z.G., Xue, Z.G., Ding, W.X. & Sheng, H.Z. (2003). Embryonic stem cells generated by nuclear transfer of human somatic nuclei into rabbit oocytes. Cell Res. 13, 251–63.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Do, J.T., Lee, J.W., Lee, B.Y., Kim, S.B., Ryoo, Z.Y., Lee, H.T. & Chung, K.S. (2002). Fate of donor mitochondrial DNA in cloned bovine embryos produced by microinjection of cumulus cells. Biol. Reprod. 67, 555–60.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dominko, T., Mitalipova, M., Haley, B., Beyhan, Z., Memili, E., McKusick, B. & First, N. L. (1999). Bovine oocyte cytoplasm supports development of embryos produced by nuclear transfer of somatic cell nuclei from various mammalian species. Biol. Reprod. 60, 1496–502.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
French, A.J., Adams, C.A., Anderson, L.S., Kitchen, J.R., Hughes, M.R. & Wood, S.H. (2008). Development of human cloned blastocysts following somatic cell nuclear transfer with adult fibroblasts. Stem Cells 26, 485–93.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Illmensee, K., Levanduski, M. & Zavos, P.M. (2006). Evaluation of the embryonic preimplantation potential of human adult somatic cells via an embryo interspecies bioassay using bovine oocytes. Fertil. Steril. 85 Suppl 1, 1248–60.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kwon, D.K., Hong, S.G., Park, H.J., Kang, J.T., Koo, O.J. & Lee, B.C. (2009). Epiblast isolation by a new four stage method (peeling) from whole bovine cloned blastocysts. Cell Biol. Int. 33, 309–17.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Li, F., Cao, H., Zhang, Q., Li, R., Chen, X., Fang, Z., Xue, K., Chen da, Y. & Sheng, H.Z. (2008). Activation of human embryonic gene expression in cytoplasmic hybrid embryos constructed between bovine oocytes and human fibroblasts. Cloning Stem Cells 10, 297305.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lorthongpanich, C., Laowtammathron, C., Chan, A.W., Ketudat-Cairns, M. & Parnpai, R. (2008). Development of interspecies cloned monkey embryos reconstructed with bovine enucleated oocytes. J. Reprod. Dev. 54, 306–13.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Minger, S. (2007). Interspecies SCNT-derived human embryos—a new way forward for regenerative medicine. Regen. Med. 2, 103–6.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Okahara-Narita, J., Tsuchiya, H., Takada, T. & Torii, R. (2007). Cloned blastocysts produced by nuclear transfer from somatic cells in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Primates 48, 232–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Simerly, C., Navara, C., Hyun, S.H., Lee, B.C., Kang, S.K., Capuano, S., Gosman, G., Dominko, T., Chong, K.Y., Compton, D., Hwang, W.S. & Schatten, G. (2004). Embryogenesis and blastocyst development after somatic cell nuclear transfer in nonhuman primates: overcoming defects caused by meiotic spindle extraction. Dev. Biol. 276, 237–52.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
St John, J.C., Armstrong, L., Minger, S.L. & Campbell, K.H. (2008). Law should recognize value of interspecies embryos. Nature 451, 627.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Stojkovic, M., Stojkovic, P., Leary, C., Hall, V.J., Armstrong, L., Herbert, M., Nesbitt, M., Lako, M. & Murdoch, A. (2005). Derivation of a human blastocyst after heterologous nuclear transfer to donated oocytes. Reprod. Biomed. Online 11, 226–31.Google ScholarPubMed
Tecirlioglu, R.T., Guo, J. & Trounson, A.O. (2006). Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer and preliminary data for horse-cow/mouse iSCNT. Stem Cell Rev. 2, 277–87.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thomson, J.A., Kalishman, J., Golos, T.G., Durning, M., Harris, C.P., Becker, R.A. & Hearn, J.P. (1995). Isolation of a primate embryonic stem cell line. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 7844–8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thomson, J.A., Itskovitz-Eldor, J., Shapiro, S.S., Waknitz, M.A., Swiergiel, J.J., Marshall, V.S. & Jones, J.M. (1998). Embryonic stem cell lines derived from human blastocysts. Science 282, 1145–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yang, C.X., Han, Z.M., Wen, D.C., Sun, Q.Y., Zhang, K.Y., Zhang, L.S., Wu, Y.Q., Kou, Z.H. & Chen, D.Y. (2003). In vitro development and mitochondrial fate of macaca-rabbit cloned embryos. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 65, 396401.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yang, C.X., Kou, Z.H., Wang, K., Jiang, Y., Mao, W.W., Sun, Q.Y., Sheng, H.Z. & Chen, D.Y. (2004). Quantitative analysis of mitochondrial DNAs in macaque embryos reprogrammed by rabbit oocytes. Reproduction 127, 201–5.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zhou, Q., Yang, S.H., Ding, C.H., He, X.C., Xie, Y.H., Hildebrandt, T.B., Mitalipov, S.M., Tang, X.H., Wolf, D.P. & Ji, W.Z. (2006). A comparative approach to somatic cell nuclear transfer in the rhesus monkey. Hum. Reprod. 21, 2564–71.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Blastocysts derived from adult fibroblasts of a rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) using interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Blastocysts derived from adult fibroblasts of a rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) using interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Blastocysts derived from adult fibroblasts of a rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) using interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *