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In-silico investigation of genomic regions related to ascites and identifying their pathways in broilers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 May 2019

P. DAVOODI
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tarbiat Modares University, PO Box 14115-336, Tehran, Iran
A. EHSANI
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tarbiat Modares University, PO Box 14115-336, Tehran, Iran
Corresponding
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Abstract

The importance of ascites in the poultry industry warrants a comprehensive systematic review and in-silico modelling to explain responses seen in previous studies in this field. By identifying the genes which are effective and relevant to different indicator traits of ascites in poultry, genes were separated base on chromosomes to determine the most effective chromosome in ascites. Consequently, 12 chromosomes have been discovered as containing effective regions on ascites incidence. Meanwhile, 24 genes including MPPK2, AT1, RhoGTPase, MC4R, CDH6, NOS3, HIF-1A, OSBL6, CCDC141, BMPR2, LEPR, AGTR1, UTS2D, 5HT2B, SST, CHRD, TFRC, CDH13, ACVRL1, ARNT, ACE, ACVRL1, MEF2C, and HTR1A affect ascites according to published studies. The results show that chromosome 9, with the presence of six related genes, chromosomes 1, 2 and 7 with three related genes and Z containing two genes have the most influence on the sensitivity to the ascites syndrome, respectively.

Type
Review
Copyright
Copyright © World's Poultry Science Association 2019 

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