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Modeling and characterization of PCB coils for inductive wireless charging

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 October 2015

Brian Curran
Affiliation:
TU Berlin, Straße des 17, Juni 135, 10623 Berlin, Germany. Phone: +4903046403757
Uwe Maaß
Affiliation:
TU Berlin, Straße des 17, Juni 135, 10623 Berlin, Germany. Phone: +4903046403757
Gerhard Fotheringham
Affiliation:
Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration, Gustav-Meyer Allee 25, 13355, Berlin
Nobby Stevens
Affiliation:
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Oude Markt 13, 3000 Leuven, Belgien
Ivan Ndip
Affiliation:
Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration, Gustav-Meyer Allee 25, 13355, Berlin
Klaus-Dieter Lang
Affiliation:
TU Berlin, Straße des 17, Juni 135, 10623 Berlin, Germany. Phone: +4903046403757 Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration, Gustav-Meyer Allee 25, 13355, Berlin
Corresponding

Abstract

Wireless charging is emerging as a viable technology in many industries, including consumer, medical, and sensor electronics. An investigation of design principles is conducted for a wireless charging platform that is designed to charge devices of different sizes and technologies, using only through vias. It is shown that at a 5 mm separation distance, a coupling coefficient can be achieved which varies from 0.12 to 0.37 when staggered hexagonal transmitter coils (approximately 5 cm across) are used with an unstaggered square receiver coil, which declines to 0.06–0.11 at 2 cm separation. Without design measures, the coupling coefficient will approach zero at certain positions. The quality factors of the coils can be improved by stacking the coils in parallel, enabling the use of only through-vias, while the inductance can be controlled horizontally by increasing the number of turns in the inductor.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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References

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