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Weed Management in Conventional- and No-Till Soybean Using Flumioxazin/Pyroxasulfone

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Kris J. Mahoney*
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph Ridgetown Campus, 120 Main Street East, Ridgetown, ON N0P 2C0, Canada
Christy Shropshire
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph Ridgetown Campus, 120 Main Street East, Ridgetown, ON N0P 2C0, Canada
Peter H. Sikkema
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph Ridgetown Campus, 120 Main Street East, Ridgetown, ON N0P 2C0, Canada
*
Corresponding author's E-mail: kmahoney@uoguelph.ca.

Abstract

Eleven field experiments were conducted over a 3-yr period (2010, 2011, and 2012) in conventional- and no-till soybean with a flumioxazin and pyroxasulfone premix. PRE and preplant applications were evaluated for soybean injury, weed control, and yield compared to standard herbicides. Early-season soybean injury from flumioxazin/pyroxasulfone ranged from 1 to 19%; however, by harvest, soybean yields were similar across labeled rates (160 and 200 g ai ha−1), standard treatments, and the nontreated control. Flumioxazin/pyroxasulfone provided excellent control (99 to 100%) of velvetleaf, pigweed species (redroot pigweed and smooth pigweed), and common lambsquarters across almost all rates tested (80 to 480 g ai ha−1). Common ragweed, green foxtail, and giant foxtail control increased with flumioxazin/pyroxasulfone rate. The biologically effective rates varied between tillage systems. The flumioxazin/pyroxasulfone rate required to provide 80% control (R80) of pigweed was 3 and 273 g ai ha−1 under conventional- and no-till, respectively. For common ragweed, the R80 was 158 g ai ha−1 under conventional tillage; yet, under no-till, the rate was nonestimable. The results indicate that flumioxazin/pyroxasulfone can provide effective weed control as a setup for subsequent herbicide applications.

Durante un período de 3 años (2010, 2011, y 2012), se realizaron once experimentos de campo usando pre-mezclas de flumioxazin y pyroxasulfone en soya con labranza convencional y cero labranza. Se evaluó el efecto de aplicaciones PRE y pre-siembra en el daño de la soya, el control de malezas, y el rendimiento en comparación con herbicidas estándar. El daño de la soya, temprano durante la temporada de crecimiento, producto de flumioxazin/pyroxasulfone varió entre 1 y 19%. Sin embargo, al momento de la cosecha, los rendimientos de la soya fueron similares al compararse las dosis de etiqueta (160 y 200 g ai ha−1), los tratamientos estándar, y el testigo sin tratamiento. Flumioxazin/pyroxasulfone brindó excelente control (99 a 100%) de Abutilon theophrasti, Amaranthus retroflexus, Amaranthus hybridus, y Chenopodium album en casi todas las dosis evaluadas (80 a 480 g ai ha−1). El control de Ambrosia artemisiifolia, Setaria viridis, y Setaria faberi aumentó con la dosis de flumioxazin/pyroxasulfone. Las dosis biológicamente efectivas fueron diferentes según el sistema de labranza. La dosis de flumioxazin/pyroxasulfone requerida para brindar 80% de control (R80) de Amaranthus spp. fue 3 y 273 g ai ha−1 en labranza convencional y en labranza cero, respectivamente. Para A. artemisiifolia, la R80 fue 158 g ai ha−1 en labranza convencional, aunque en labranza cero, la dosis no fue estimable. Los resultados indican que flumioxazin/pyroxasulfone puede brindar un control inicial de malezas efectivo que sirva de base para aplicaciones subsecuentes de otros herbicidas.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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