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Weed Management and Crop Response with Glyphosate, S-Metolachlor, Trifloxysulfuron, Prometryn, and Msma in Glyphosate-Resistant Cotton

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Scott B. Clewis
Affiliation:
Crop Science Department, Campus Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
D.K. Miller
Affiliation:
Louisiana State University AgCenter., P.O. Box 438, St. Joseph, LA 71366
C.H. Koger
Affiliation:
U.S. Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service (USDA–ARS), Crop Genetics and Production Research Unit, Stoneville, MS 38776
T.A. Baughman
Affiliation:
Texas A&M Research & Extension Center, Vernon, TX 76385
A.J. Price
Affiliation:
USDA–ARS, National Soil Dynamics Laboratory, 411 S. Donahue Dr. Auburn, AL 36832
D. Porterfield
Affiliation:
Nufarm Americas, Inc., P.O. Box 13439, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709
J.W. Wilcut
Affiliation:
Crop Science Department, Campus Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Field studies were conducted in five states at six locations from 2002 through 2003 to evaluate weed control and cotton response to early POST (EPOST), POST/POST-directed spray (PDS), and late POST-directed (LAYBY) systems using glyphosate-trimethylsulfonium salt (TM), s-metolachlor, trifloxysulfuron, prometryn, and MSMA. Early POST applications were made from mid May through mid June; POST/PDS applications were made from early June through mid July; and LAYBY applications were made from early July through mid August. Early season cotton injury and discoloration was minimal (< 1%) with all treatments; mid- and late-season injury was minimal (< 2%) except for trifloxysulfuron POST (11 and 9%, respectively). Annual grasses evaluated included barnyardgrass, broadleaf signalgrass, goosegrass, and large crabgrass. Broadleaf weeds evaluated included entireleaf morningglory, pitted morningglory, sicklepod, and smooth pigweed. For the EPOST, POST/PDS, and LAYBY applications, weeds were at cotyledon to 10 leaf, 1 to 25 leaf, and 2 to 25 leaf stage, respectively. Annual broadleaf and grass control was increased with the addition of s-metolachlor to glyphosate-TM EPOST systems (85 to 98% control) compared with glyphosate-TM EPOST alone (65 to 91% control), except for sicklepod control where equivalent control was observed. Annual grass control was greater with glyphosate-TM plus trifloxysulfuron PDS than with trifloxysulfuron POST or PDS, or trifloxysulfuron plus MSMA PDS (90 to 94% vs. 75 to 83% control). With few exceptions, broadleaf weed control was equivalent for trifloxysulfuron applied POST alone or PDS alone or in combination with glyphosate-TM PDS or MSMA PDS herbicide treatments (81 to 99% control). The addition of a LAYBY herbicide treatment increased broadleaf weed control by 11 to 36 percentage points compared with systems without a LAYBY. Cotton lint yield increased 420 kg/ha with the addition of s-metolachlor to glyphosate-TM EPOST treatments compared with systems without s-metolachlor EPOST. Cotton lint yield was increased 330 to 910 kg/ha with the addition of a POST herbicide treatment compared with systems without a POST/PDS treatment. The addition of a LAYBY herbicide treatment increased cotton lint yield by 440 kg/ha compared with systems without a LAYBY.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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Weed Management and Crop Response with Glyphosate, S-Metolachlor, Trifloxysulfuron, Prometryn, and Msma in Glyphosate-Resistant Cotton
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