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Weed Control in Corn (Zea mays) as Affected by Till-Plant Systems and Herbicides

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Edward E. Schweizer
Affiliation:
Agric. Res. Serv., U.S. Dep. Agric., Ft. Collins, CO 80523
Robert L. Zimdahl
Affiliation:
Plant Pathol. Weed Sci., Colo. State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO 80523
Rome H. Mickelson
Affiliation:
Agric. Res. Serv., U. S. Dep. Agric., Walsenburg, CO 81089

Abstract

The impact of three till-plant and two weed management systems on weed seed reserves of soil, yearly weed problems, and corn production was assessed under center-pivot irrigation for 3 consecutive years. Annual weeds were controlled in disced, bedded, and strip rotary till-plant systems with a moderate or intensive level of herbicides. Weed seed of seven annual weed species were identified, with common lambsquarters and stinkgrass, comprising 45 and 41%, respectively, of the initial 305 million seed/ha in the upper 25 cm of the soil profile. After the third cropping year, overall decline in total seed number in soil was 45% when averaged over till-plant and weed management systems. Grain yields did not differ between weed management systems, but the disced till-plant system produced 16% less grain than the bedded and strip rotary till-plant systems over 2 yr.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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References

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