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Metamifop Rates, Application Timings, and Broadleaf Herbicide Admixtures Affect Smooth Crabgrass Control in Turf

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Michael C. Cox
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Science, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 435 Old Glade Road, Blacksburg, VA 24061
Shawn D. Askew
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Science, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 435 Old Glade Road, Blacksburg, VA 24061
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Metamifop is an aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicide under evaluation in the United States for annual grass control in cool-season turfgrasses. Insufficient information is available on the most effective metamifop application timings and mixtures for POST smooth crabgrass control. Field trials conducted in Blacksburg, VA, evaluated metamifop for smooth crabgrass control in existing stands of perennial ryegrass, Kentucky bluegrass, and tall fescue at three rates compared to fenoxaprop, metamifop applied twice at three application intervals, and metamifop in combination with the broadleaf herbicides carfentrazone, 2,4-D plus dicamba plus mecoprop (DDM), and mesotrione. Smooth crabgrass control was equivalent with metamifop at 400 g ai ha−1 and fenoxaprop at 195 g ai ha−1. Smooth crabgrass cover was 2% or less, 12 wk after initial treatment, when treated twice with metamifop (300 g ha−1) at a 3-, 6-, or 8-wk interval and significantly better than metamifop applied once. Smooth crabgrass cover was significantly greater at every assessment date in plots treated with metamifop plus DDM than all other metamifop plus broadleaf herbicide admixtures. Metamifop did not appear to significantly injure any turfgrass in these studies, but conclusions about metamifop safety to cool-season turfgrasses cannot be made from these studies due to nonreplication of turfgrass species. According to these data, metamifop is an effective herbicide for controlling smooth crabgrass in cool-season turfgrasses when applied once at 300 or 400 g ha−1 or twice at a 3-, 6-, or 8-wk interval. Although metamifop continues to control smooth crabgrass when added to some broadleaf herbicides, smooth crabgrass control was reduced when metamifop was combined with DDM.

Metamifop es un herbicida aryloxyphenoxypropionate que está siendo evaluado en los Estados Unidos para el control de gramíneas anuales en céspedes de clima frío. La información disponible es insuficiente acerca de los momentos más efectivos de aplicación de metamifop para el control POST de Digitaria ischaemum. Experimentos de campo realizados en Blacksburg, Virginia, evaluaron el control de D. ischaemum con tres dosis de metamifop en céspedes establecidos de Lolium perenne, Poa pratensis, y Lolium arundinaceum y se comparó con fenoxaprop, metamifop aplicado dos veces en tres intervalos de aplicación, y metamifop en combinación con los herbicidas de hoja ancha carfentrazone, 2,4-D más dicamba más mecoprop (DDM), y mesotrione. El control de D. ischaemum fue equivalente con metamifop a 400 g ai ha−1 y fenoxaprop a 195 g ai ha ha−1. La cobertura de D. ischaemum fue 2% o menor, 12 semanas después del tratamiento inicial, cuando se trató dos veces con metamifop (300 g ha−1) a intervalos de 3, 6, u 8 semanas y fue significativamente mejor que metamifop aplicado una sola vez. La cobertura de D. ischaemum fue significativamente mayor en cada fecha de evaluación en parcelas tratadas con metamifop más DDM que en cualquiera de las otras mezclas de metamifop más otros herbicidas de hoja ancha. Parece que metamifop no dañó significativamente ninguna de las especies de césped estudiadas, pero no se pueden hacer conclusiones acerca de la seguridad de metamifop en céspedes de clima frío a partir estos estudios debido a que no hubo replicaciones por especie de césped. De acuerdo a estos resultados, metamifop es un herbicida efectivo para el control de D. ischaemum en céspedes de clima frío cuando se aplica una vez a 300 ó 400 g ha−1 o dos veces a intervalos de 3, 6, u 8 semanas.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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Metamifop Rates, Application Timings, and Broadleaf Herbicide Admixtures Affect Smooth Crabgrass Control in Turf
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