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Mesotrione Combinations with Atrazine and Bentazon for Yellow and Purple Nutsedge (Cyperus Esculentus and C. Rotundus) Control in Corn

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Gregory R. Armel
Affiliation:
Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Virginia Tech, Painter, VA 23420
Henry P. Wilson*
Affiliation:
Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Virginia Tech, Painter, VA 23420
Robert J. Richardson
Affiliation:
Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Virginia Tech, Painter, VA 23420
Cory M. Whaley
Affiliation:
Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Virginia Tech, Painter, VA 23420
Thomas E. Hines
Affiliation:
Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Virginia Tech, Painter, VA 23420
*
Corresponding author's E-mail: hwilson@vt.edu

Abstract

Field and greenhouse studies were conducted to evaluate mesotrione alone and in combinations with low rates of atrazine and bentazon for control of yellow and purple nutsedge. Mesotrione alone at rates of 105 to 210 g ai/ha controlled yellow nutsedge 43 to 70%. Mixtures of mesotrione with atrazine at 280 g ai/ha did not always improve yellow nutsedge control over that by mesotrione alone, but increasing atrazine to 560 g ai/ha in these mixtures generally provided more consistent control of yellow nutsedge. Mesotrione at 105 g ai/ha mixed with bentazon at 280 or 560 g ai/ha controlled yellow nutsedge 88% or greater which was similar to control from the standard halosulfuron at 36 g ai/ha. Mesotrione, atrazine, and bentazon alone did not control purple nutsedge. Mixtures of mesotrione plus bentazon, however, did improve control of purple nutsedge over either herbicide applied alone, but this control was not considered commercially acceptable.

Type
Weed Management — Major Crops
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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