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Influence of Adjuvants and Bromoxynil on Absorption of Clethodim

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

A. Stanley Culpepper
Affiliation:
Crop Science Department, Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
David L. Jordan
Affiliation:
Crop Science Department, Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Alan C. York
Affiliation:
Crop Science Department, Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Frederick T. Corbin
Affiliation:
Crop Science Department, Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Yvonna Sheldon
Affiliation:
Crop Science Department, Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The effect of nonionic surfactant, crop oil concentrate, organosilicone surfactant, methylated seed oil, and a blend of organosilicone surfactant and methylated seed oil on absorption of 14C-clethodim was evaluated in barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli). Absorption of 14C-label was greatest during the first 40 min after application when 14C-clethodim was applied with methylated seed oil or a blend of methylated seed oil and organosilicone surfactant. These adjuvants increased the rate of absorption more than crop oil concentrate, organosilicone surfactant, or nonionic surfactant. Crop oil concentrate was more effective than organosilicone or nonionic surfactant in increasing absorption, with nonionic surfactant being more effective than organosilicone surfactant. These results generally agreed with the order of increasing efficacy of clethodim on barnyardgrass as affected by adjuvants in field experiments. Another study was conducted to determine the effect of bromoxynil on absorption and translocation of 14C-clethodim in yellow foxtail (Setaria glauca). Bromoxynil reduced absorption of 14C–clethodim 4, 8, and 24 h after application and also reduced the amount of 14C-label translocated from the treated leaf. These data suggest that antagonism of clethodim control of yellow foxtail by bromoxynil observed in previous research can be attributed partially to decreased absorption and translocation of clethodim.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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Footnotes

1

Current address of first author: Georgia Cooperative Extension Service, Rural Development Center, P.O. Box 1209, Tifton, GA 31793.

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