Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-77ffc5d9c7-jwc9c Total loading time: 0.303 Render date: 2021-04-23T00:39:08.208Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Characterizing Weed Community Seedling Emergence for a Semiarid Site in Colorado

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

R. L. Anderson
Affiliation:
Agric. Res. Serv., U.S. Dep. Agric., Akron, CO 80720

Abstract

This study characterized the emergence pattern of a weed community of 16 species between April 1 and August 31 over a 7-yr period. Weed seedlings were counted weekly in quadrats established in winter wheat stubble within no-till and conventional-till production systems. Weed emergence showed two peaks, the first between April 25 and May 9, and the second between May 30 and June 13. Tillage did not affect the weed community emergence pattern. Knowledge of weed community emergence pattern in conjunction with crop simulation models could be used to suggest cultural practices such as optimal planting dates that favor a crop over weeds, and possibly reduce herbicide use for within-crop weed control.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by the Weed Science Society of America 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Anderson, R. L. 1987. Broadleaf weed control in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) with sulfonylurea herbicides. Weed Technol. 1:242246.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Anderson, R. L. 1990. Tolerance of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius), corn (Zea mays), and proso millet (Panicm miliaceum) to clomazone. Weed Technol. 4:606611.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Anderson, R. L. 1990. No-till proso millet production. Agron. J. 82:577580.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Berkowitz, A. R. 1988. Competition for resources in weed crop mixtures. P. 89119 in Altieri, M. A. and Liebman, M., eds. Weed Management in Agroecosystems: Ecological Approaches. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.Google Scholar
5. Dale, M. R. and Thomas, A. G. 1987. The structure of weed communities in Saskatchewan fields. Weed Sci. 35:348355.Google Scholar
6. Forcella, F., Eradat-Oskoui, K., and Wagner, S. W. 1993. Application of weed seedbank ecology to low-input crop management. Ecol. Applic. 3:7483.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7. Forcella, F., Westgate, M. E., and Warnes, D. D. 1992. Effect of row width on herbicide and cultivation requirements in row crops. Am. J. Alternative Agric. 7:161167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Froud-Williams, R. J., Chancellor, R. J., and Drennan, D. S. H. 1984. The effects of seed burial and soil disturbance on emergence and survival of arable weeds in relation to minimal cultivation. J. Appl. Ecol. 21:629641.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Gunsolus, J. L. 1990. Mechanical and cultural weed control in corn and soybeans. Am. J. Alternative Agric. 5:114119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Halvorson, A. D. 1990. Cropping systems and N fertilization for efficient water use in the Central Great Plains. P. 117123 in Proc. Great Plains Conservation Tillage Symposium. Great Plains Agric. Council Bull. No. 131.Google Scholar
11. Hinze, G. O. and Smika, D. E. 1983. Cropping practices: Central Great Plains. P. 387395 in Dregne, H. E. and Willis, W. O., ed. Dryland Agriculture. Am. Soc. Agron. Monogr. Ser. 23.Google Scholar
12. Hume, L., Tessier, S., and Dyck, F. B. 1991. Tillage and rotation influences on weed community composition in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in southwestern Saskatchewan. Can. J. Plant Sci. 71:783789.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13. Kiniry, J. R., Blanchet, R., Williams, J. R., Texier, V., Jones, C. A., and Cabelguenne, M. 1992. Sunflower simulation using the EPIC and ALMANAC models. Field Crops Res. 30:403423.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Lee, D. J. 1992. Functional form selection for regional crop response to salinity, water application, and climate. J. Prod. Agric. 5:445454.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15. Lee, J. G., Bryant, K. J., and Lacewell, R. D. 1989. Crop rotation selection versus wind erosion susceptibility. J. Soil Water Conserv. 44:620624.Google Scholar
16. Lyon, D. J. and Anderson, R. L. 1993. Crop response to fallow applications of atrazine and clomazone. Weed Technol. 7:949953.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17. Major, C. S. 1992. Addressing public fears over pesticides. Weed Technol. 6:471472.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18. McMaster, G. S., Morgan, J. A., and Wilhelm, W. W. 1992. Simulating winter wheat spike development and growth. Agric. For. Meteorol. 60:193220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19. Nielsen, D. C. and Anderson, R. L. 1993. Managing residue and storing precipitation. USDA-SCS Conservation Tillage Fact Sheet, #2-93. Lake-wood, CO. 2 p.Google Scholar
20. Ogg, A. G. Jr. and Dawson, J. H. 1984. Time of emergence of eight weed species. Weed Sci. 32:327335.Google Scholar
21. Peterson, G. A., Westfall, D. G., and Halvorson, A. D. 1992. Economics of dryland crop rotations for efficient water and nitrogen use. In Havlin, J. L. ed. Proc. Great Plains Soil Fertility Conf. 4:4753.Google Scholar
22. Peterson, G. A., Westfall, D. G., Toman, N. E., and Anderson, R. L. 1993. Sustainable dryland cropping systems: economic analysis. Colorado State Univ. Agric. Exp. Stn. Tech. Bull. TB93-3. 15 p.Google Scholar
23. Roberts, H. A. and Feast, P. M. 1973. Emergence and longevity of seeds of annual weeds in cultivated and undisturbed soil. J. Appl. Ecol. 10:133144.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
24. Shaw, W. C. 1982. Integrated weed management systems technology for pest management. Weed Sci. 30, Suppl. 1:212.Google Scholar
25. Smika, D. E. 1990. Fallow management practices for wheat production in the Central Great Plains. Agron. J. 82:319323.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
26. Smika, D. E., Page, A. B., and Mickelson, R. H. 1986. Snow management for crop production in the central Great Plains. P. 335344 in Steppuhn, H. and Nichlaichuk, W., eds. Proc. Symp. Snow Management for Agriculture, Great Plains Agric. Counc. Pub. 120.Google Scholar
27. Smith, E. G. and Hallan, A. 1990. Determination of an optimal cropping system for erosive soil. J. Prod. Agric. 4:591596.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
28. Stoller, E. W. and Wax, L. M. 1973. Periodicity of germination and emergence of some annual weeds. Weed Sci. 21:574580.Google Scholar
29. Walker, R. H. and Buchanan, G. A. 1982. Crop manipulation in integrated weed management systems. Weed Sci. 30, Suppl. 1:1724.Google Scholar
30. Wicks, G. A. and Smika, D. E. 1990. Central Great Plains. P. 127157 in Donald, W. W., ed. Systems of Weed Control in Wheat in North America. Weed Sci. Soc. Am., Champaign, IL.Google Scholar
31. Williams, J. R., Jones, C. A., Kiniry, J. R., and Spanel, D. A. 1989. The EPIC crop growth model. Trans. Am. Soc. Agric. Eng. 32:497511.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
32. Wyse, D. L. 1992. Future of weed science research. Weed Technol. 6:162165.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 4 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 12th June 2017 - 23rd April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Characterizing Weed Community Seedling Emergence for a Semiarid Site in Colorado
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Characterizing Weed Community Seedling Emergence for a Semiarid Site in Colorado
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Characterizing Weed Community Seedling Emergence for a Semiarid Site in Colorado
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *