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Benzobicyclon Activity on Common Louisiana Rice Weeds

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2018

Benjamin M. McKnight
Affiliation:
Research Associate, School of Plant, Environmental, and Soil Science, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA
Eric P. Webster*
Affiliation:
Professor, School of Plant, Environmental, and Soil Science, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA
David C. Blouin
Affiliation:
Professor, Department of Experimental Statistics, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA
*
Author for correspondence: Eric P. Webster, School of Plant, Environmental, and Soil Science, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, 104 Sturgis Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803. (Email: ewebster@agcenter.lsu.edu)

Abstract

A study was conducted at three locations in Louisiana to evaluate the response of common Louisiana rice weed species to different rates of application of benzobicyclon herbicide. Benzobicyclon was applied at 31, 62, 123, 185, 246, 493, 739, 986, and 1,232 g ai ha–1 into flooded field conditions when ducksalad was at the first elongated-leaf stage. Barnyardgrass, false pimpernel, and yellow nutsedge control never exceeded 50% from any rate of benzobicyclon applied, averaged across evaluation timing. Ducksalad control, averaged across evaluation timing, was 83% when treated with 493 g ha−1 and did not increase when treated with higher rates of benzobicyclon. At 42 d after treatment (DAT), purple ammannia and Indian toothcup treated with 185 and 246 g ha–1 of benzobicyclon were controlled 58% and 81%, respectively, and did not differ in control compared with higher rates of benzobicyclon. All weeds were hand-harvested from each plot and separated by species at the conclusion of the study. No differences in fresh-weight biomass were observed for barnyardgrass, false pimpernel, purple ammannia, or yellow nutsedge. Treatment with benzobicyclon at ≥62 g ha–1 resulted in reduced ducksalad fresh weight 42 DAT compared with the nontreated sample. Indian toothcup fresh weight was reduced 77% to 96% compared with the nontreated sample when treated with benzobicyclon at 246 to 1,232 g ha–1.

Type
Weed Management-Major Crops
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2018 

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