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Variation in Growth Habit and Response to Chemicals among Three Common Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium) Selections

  • Robert N. Andersen (a1)

Abstract

Burs of common cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium L.) obtained from Stoneville, Mississippi; Urbana, Illinois; and Lamberton, Minnesota, were used in greenhouse and growth chamber studies. The Mississippi and the Illinois strains were both classified as being in the “strumarium” complex of X. strumarium, whereas, the Minnesota strain was classified as being in the “hybrid” complex. The Minnesota common cocklebur developed branch leaves in the leaf axils of the main stem to a much greater extent than did the Mississippi and Illinois common cocklebur. The Mississippi common cocklebur was frequently more tolerant of postemergence applications of bentazon [3-isopropyl-1H-2,1,3-benzothiadiazin-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide] than were the Illinois and Minnesota common cockebur. The Mississippi and Illinois common cocklebur developed leaf necrosis when sprayed with an insecticide formulation containing malathion (o, o-dimethyl phosphorodithioate of mercaptosuccinate) and petroleum solvents; the Minnesota common cocklebur did not.

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References

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1. Löve, D. and Dansereau, P. 1959. Biosystematic studies on Xanthium: taxonomic appraisal and ecological status. Can. J. Bot. 37:173208.
2. McMillan, C. 1975. The Xanthium strumarium complexes in Australia. Aust. J. Bot. 23:173192.
3. Ray, P. M. and Alexander, W. E. 1966. Photoperiodic adaptation to latitude in Xanthium strumarium . Am. J. Bot. 53:806816.

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Variation in Growth Habit and Response to Chemicals among Three Common Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium) Selections

  • Robert N. Andersen (a1)

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